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Discussion Starter #1
My time in Viet Nam taught me for the horrors of killing another person--
45 years later I still ask for forgiveness.

Having said that, when I was a Deputy Sheriff Sergeant conducting my roll call briefing I occasionally told my squad if you are not prepared and willing to pull the trigger in defense of another: citizen, co-worker, bad guy, good guy whatever. If you are not willing, go home. You are a danger to yourselves and others. To so many of us "Protect and Serve" was more than just a saying.

The following is a very well written explanation of the confusion around us. Please take the time to follow the links.

http://www.breachbangclear.com/ferguson-idiot-cops-and-experts-who-know-nothing-at-all/

http://www.policeone.com/patrol-issues/articles/6199620-Why-one-cop-carries-145-rounds-of-ammo-on-the-job/
 

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My feelings exactly.
 

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Good articles Frank

Warning - some graphic videos (accurate though)

Seems to be that some folks don't get it and are attacking the police.
 

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My time in Viet Nam taught me for the horrors of
killing another person--
45 years later I still ask for forgiveness.

Having said that, when I was a Deputy Sheriff Sergeant conducting my roll
call briefing I occasionally told my squad if you are not prepared and willing
to pull the trigger in defense of another: citizen, co-worker, bad guy, good
guy whatever. If you are not willing, go home. You are a danger to
yourselves and others. To so many of us "Protect and Serve" was more
than just a saying.
My cousin Henry, who I was very close with as kids, recently retired as a peace
officer after a long career. Being an officer was his life goal and you could
see just how proud we was to be on the job. However not everything
went well at the beginning in law enforcement for him. He got off to a
tough start and at that time, he thought it may be over for him.

About 30 years ago, he and his partner were on late night patrol in a
warehouse area of town when they confronted heavily armed burglars.
A firefight broke out and at the end of it all, his partner lost his life and my
cousin had taken out one of the perpetrators. He was supported by his
department but it still took him about 5 years before he could return to
work as a cop.

The incident really shook him up for a long time. We spent a lot of time
doing activities together, and having a good time just like we did when
we were little kids growing up.

And as you say he was worried during those 5 years being out of the
department, about being able to pull the trigger again, if needed. And then
deal with the aftermath of all that should that happen again. He eventually
found that inner strength and made it back to work as an officer.

Anyway, as I mentioned he recently retired after years of service and
received honors, a public mention in his local newspaper for his work with
the community, and recognition by his chief. One thing though, I have
his police S&W Model 19 in my safe with a notch in the grip (I kid you not).

When he went back to work on the streets, he selected a semi-auto...
 

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good article ...

my buddy was a St Louis County PD ( we do lunch every Tuesday )
Charlie and i have talked about this case ...

his thoughts is D. Wilson did the right thing.
Period.
mac
 

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Before I left for Iraq we went through a course called Combat Skills Training (CST).
During one part of the class covering what to do in a split decision life threatening situation, the instructor told us, "It's better to be tried by 12 than carried by six".
 

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Frank - Rest assured there are a ton of folks out there that "get it" and support our law enforcement every single day. Sad what the press spews out as "news" giving air time to any bozo with an opinion that helps support their slanted view.




And thank you & geroux for your service to our country.
 

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Frank - Rest assured there are a ton of folks out there that "get it" and support our law enforcement every single day. Sad what the press spews out as "news" giving air time to any bozo with an opinion that helps support their slanted view.
And thank you & geroux for your service to our country.
You got that right!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
CAJW, Black Rubi. Thank you. I have heard this before but it is always good to hear it again.

For those people who have never been in "hot" combat, or have been (are) a law enforcement officer it is difficult to really understand the emotions behind some of my post. Maybe it is PTSD--although I never thought it attached to me. :rolleyes:
 

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Maybe it is PTSD--although I never thought it attached to me. :rolleyes:
I know I haven't been exposed to as extreme dangerous situations as some here.
I never fired a weapon at anyone, although I was prepared to a couple times. Had one dude in my sights.
Iraq we did get indirect mortar attacks daily. I still get jumpy at a loud unexpected BOOMs, and hate fireworks.

But to get to the point... I think we all (anyone been in a combat zone) have a little PTSD whether diagnosed or not.

I just don't care enough to go bitch to a doctor that I'm jumpy at a car backfiring and hate fireworks now.
 

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There is a flip side to this coin.

After 10+ years experience in the US Army as an MP in Germany and the USA, my brother joined the Wisconsin State Patrol 20+ years ago. He went to the academy then rode around in a patrol car with his training sergeant. Within 2 years he was fired for failure to draw his weapon and use deadly force in accordance with policy.

The circumstances were he was one of several officers enforcing weight limits on heavy trucks. He would stop a truck and ask for the paperwork that said that they had been weighed within the state. He would always call for backup whenever he did so, in accordance with policy.

Three times when backup arrived, they found him involved in a fistfight with a truck driver. The first two times, they reprimanded him and gave him remedial training, plus desk duty until all visible evidence of the fistfight had healed. The third time, they fired him for failure to draw his weapon and make an arrest in accordance with policy.

20+ years later he can finally discuss this and says they were entirely justified. He spent most of that 20+ years as a truck driver in Wisconsin, and married to a State Patrol dispatcher. However he spent a few years before changing his mind bitterly complaining that he was fired for "not being trigger happy enough".

I'm of the opinion that he should never have been a cop. He was always looking for a fight when we were growing up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Gary, I agree entirely with you, he should not have been a cop.

I lost count of the number of arrest I made most of which were under the influence of something other than coffee. I was "on gun" many times, and several folks got thrown on the ground but never was I involved in a fight. Not necessary, and definitely not safe to either party. It is way too easy to seriously injure a person with a punch (or elbow) to a so called safe spot.
 
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