Rubicon Owners Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,706 Posts
WARN is considered by many as the reference for winches, so yes.
The VR line is their economy line design to compete with low price brands, is assembled in China, everything else is US made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The VR line is aimed at just occasional use (basically cheap insurance) if you get stuck once or twice a year on a trail that would have been fine if it didn't just rain and turn into a swamp that morning. Since that is pretty much my intention, that is what I got. I've used it exactly one time and that was to re-spool the synthetic line on to the drum under tension. The VR synthetic line is not the same as the Spydura line made for the Zeon series and the attachment mechanism to the spool is different.



If you plan on more than occasional use, consider the Zeon or Zeon Platinum series. They are much more robust and if you plan on using them every weekend, they would be the way to go. Even then, the Zeon and Zeon Platinum series are not made to be constantly wailed on multiple times every day like the Heavyweight series you see on tow trucks.



BTW, I highly recommend synthetic line as it is much safer to use. If the line snaps, there is a much lesser chance of an injury. Even then, I have a damper for the line just because. If you don't have a damper, use a jacket. I am also a fan of closed-system winching, where there is no hook to slip off a strap or recovery point. If you do use hook, remember the phrase "Hook Up" to remind you that the tip of the hook should face up. If it breaks or slips, the pieces will hit the ground instead of flying up into the air. And I am big on using a pulley where possible going back to a D shackle on a bumper. For some reason, people don't park close to my bumpers with the D shackle mounts sticking out. Funny that.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,487 Posts
I love winches, but I never got around to getting one. I always had money going somewhere else. I was rescued twice by winches in mud and snow after a lot of vain effort to extract myself. Twice rescued in 45 years of Jeeping isn’t bad. I guess it’s good I always carry food, water, and sleeping gear right? At this point in my Jeep life, I don’t see a winch in my future ever.

I carry a high lift jack and strap. As a rule, I tell someone where I’m going and have paid severely the two times I broke that rule. Going with another vehicle is first choice, but I suppose I’ve gone alone at least half the time.

Famous last words...
Hold my beer...
He did it, I...
Just to the next turn around spot...

Rules for going alone...
Know your limits.
Geographic awareness.
Tell someone where you are going.
Go slow and back off at the first snag sound.
Be able to live in place for days or walk out.
Be prepared for emergencies and in today’s times crime.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
IMHO, if you are going to get a winch, get a good one. Warn makes an excellent product, mines an XD9000i.
I would bet that you could find a good used Warn if you did a little looking.
I’ve never used my winch for me, just helping others. I will admit that I was glad to be able to assist in pulling another fellow Jeeper off the wall on Hells Revenge in Moab.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,778 Posts
[...]I carry a high lift jack and strap. As a rule, I tell someone where I’m going and have paid severely the two times I broke that rule. Going with another vehicle is first choice, but I suppose I’ve gone alone at least half the time.[...].
Having a ham radio license and a small HF radio (or at least VHF for repeaters) would be another valuable trekking resource. No repeaters? Get on HF and put out a call. There's also the Garmin Spot (I think it's Garmin) for sending text messages that some people take into wilderness areas.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top