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Discussion Starter #1
I am debating Mig welding on a new Clayton Track Bar bracket this weekend and installing my new track bar.


It is going to be done in my garage, but it is a bit cold here in Portland Oregon. Maybe be 40 in my garage overnight.


I have been told not to do it if it is going to be cold and weld on cold metal. I have also been told that I can heat up the frame with a small torch and would bring the bracket inside overnight. That would help prevent any stress or cracking due to the temp difference.


What can you tell me?


2003 TJ


Chris
 

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Hmmmm. Location says Dayton, Ohio. Post says Portland? :wink2:

Let's me just say you can not go wrong heating the metals you want to weld. If you just think about it a second welding with a huge temp difference sounds like it might lead to problem.
Wonder how they got the AK pipeline together?

Maybe a real welder will speak up:grin2:
 

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I'm no professional welder, but have had the occasion to do emergency repairs on snow plow blades during storms where temps were below freezing. We used a torch to preheat the metals... never saw any of those welds crack or fail, if it failed again it usually failed in a new area not a previously welded repair area.

So I would say preheat a bit if you have any concern about temp of the metal.

I think 225 degrees is the number I remember from machine shop days as a target, but I assume a weld engineer has sorts of inputs to determine the desired pre heat- air temps, metal thickness , filler being used, tons of inputs...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replys.

I am going to add a bit of heat to it before welding. Supposed to be around 48 tomorrow. That will help.
I have a small torch from my plumbing work and will add some heat.

Chris
 

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I reached out to a professional weld I know from another forum and here is his reply:

"They don't have to be so long as the temp difference isn't too drastic, if it was zero or below outside and the room temp bracket was 75 to 80 you may want to run a torch over the frame where you are welding first. If I remember correctly though AWS guidelines state that any metal below 45 degrees should be preheated to cook the moisture out. That is the condensed version, it gets way more specific depending on the type of metal and the application. If you do preheat, warm to the touch will be good enough."

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All complete and a warm torch did push out the moisture. You could see it when the heat hit.

Was a major pain getting the old stuff out with the rusted on stuck bolts. No pics, cause I was just busy busting knuckles!

I did a test drive and it does handle better.
 
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