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This is for anyone who is still running the MTRs that came with the Rubi...What do you keep your tire presure at? I aired down my tires the other day and didnt check what it was at before I aird down...So I put about 75 PSI which is less that the max psi....I seem to feel every bump now.....maby I just got to comfortable with the 35 psi I had put in there immediately after I got through wheeling that day...
PEte
 

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Pete,

with stock MT R`s... i had 30 PSI...on the street
50 for long Highway rides..and yes did feel lots of bumps at the level


i aired down to 15 PSI on the sandy lake bed.. no problems .


im not an expert but 75 psi is way too much for the weight of the Jeep.


my.02

mac
 
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75psi is way to much by about 2x. I run 32psi in mine, you can still feel the bumps, but that is more the E rating of the tire. Down here I don't even air down when I wheel it. Just leave it the way they are. I did air down to 20psi once, but didn't see much of a difference. Now I don't have rocks to play with, so don't worry about it as much.

Ron
 

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With a 33 inch MTR I ran mine at 28psi... I wouldn't run 31's at more than 30...JMO
 

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I run mine @ 25-26 psi, in town/around town. Before you flame, my roads are worst than a fire road. (The next time a poor fool drop his VW down to the chassis (and comes to a abrupt stop), I'll snap a photo.) At that pressure it rides better. OME is in my future. :)

On the hi-way, back up to 32 psi.

Chris
 

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I run mine at 28 psi , highway, long distance, in town, anywhere. For trail, I tried 20 and they were still almost like 28, they did not flex that much. next time I'll try 15.
 

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zeiter said:
I run mine at 28 psi , highway, long distance, in town, anywhere. For trail, I tried 20 and they were still almost like 28, they did not flex that much. next time I'll try 15.
15psi is the max that you should run those tires off-road. With a 8 inch rim width you will be safe and not have to worry about losing a bead.
 

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15psi is the max that you should run those tires off-road. With a 8 inch rim width you will be safe and not have to worry about losing a bead.[/quote]

You mean I could run them lower than 15 for off-road? or I got it wrong the other way around ( you meant no less than 15) ? please clarify. Thanks.
 

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You mean I could run them lower than 15 for off-road? or I got it wrong the other way around ( you meant no less than 15) ? please clarify. Thanks.
For stock 31s you can run at 14 psi off road. Check out the Oasis Off Road Deflation Guide at http://oasisoffroad.com/defGuide.html for discussion. Click on the Tire Deflation Chart at the bottom of that page for specifics. Note the lower pressures you can run larger tires at. :wink:

Jerry
 

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JerryC said:
You mean I could run them lower than 15 for off-road? or I got it wrong the other way around ( you meant no less than 15) ? please clarify. Thanks.
For stock 31s you can run at 14 psi off road. Check out the Oasis Off Road Deflation Guide at http://oasisoffroad.com/defGuide.html for discussion. Click on the Tire Deflation Chart at the bottom of that page for specifics. Note the lower pressures you can run larger tires at. :wink:

Jerry
Thank you Jerry.... I forgot about that web site and I even own the Oasis Deflators.......
 
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tire pressure basics

Tire Pressure and wear

Your stock tires are rated for about 3000lbs of load, since the Rubicon weighs about 4000lbs your actual load per tire is 1000lbs. A third of the displayed max load. One third the air pressure is a good starting point. I remember having mine @ 22 psi for road use. Your tires are part of the suspension and if you have to much air the ride suffers drasticly.

If you have to much air in you tire you will have premature wear down the center of the tire. To little air will wear the outer edges. After you get to a certain air pressure, take something thin and see if you can slide it under your outer tread lug. If it slides under the tire, the pressure is to much.

Another way to check (the best way, but takes time) is to mark the tread of your tire tread with some kind of chalk or grease pencil. Take it for a short ride and then look at the marked area, if all of the chalk is gone you have a flat foot print, which is the objective. If the chalk is worn off the center of the tire, the air pressure is to much.

I’m lazy so I generally drive over dust when the tire is damp and then see what the contact pattern looks like.

Keep in mind that the front and back pressures do not have to be the same depending on load. Usually not more than a couple of pounds difference.

For off road, most average trails don’t require to air down (like I said I'm lazy), but were traction is limited airing down to 15psi as said above is appropriate. But I don’t Air down Until I know I have to.

Remember that excess air off road can cause the tire to puncture easily and to little can cause you to break the Bead and cause a flat.
 
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