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Discussion Starter #1
I think this is in the correct catagory. Newbie wants to know what other than a jack and jack stands are needed in order to put on a lift? I know I need tools but specific tools needed?

Thanks and be kind... :oops:

BigasaMountain
BAAM
 
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Discussion Starter #2
hi,
i recommend a complete set of impact sockets, an impact gun, and an air compressor. you can do it without air tools but i dont know why anybody would want to.
youre also going to need an assortment of large screwdrivers, pry bars, wrenches, and plenty of beer.
 

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i recommend coil spring compressors, a drill (depending upon if your kit comes with a rear track bar bracket), and a hammer or mallet. if you don't feel like running out and buying a complete impact setup ($$$) or have access to one, have a breaker bar on hand to go along with your standard socket set.

oh, and some type of lubricant - WD40, PB Blaster, Liquid Wrench etc.
 

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I agree with the previous posts with the following clarifications and additions:

Get 12 ton jack stands. Not because you need the weight capacity, but because you'll want the height. Harbor Freight sells them for about $79 a pair. Make sure your jack has decent extension.

A pair of ramps is also useful. Depending on how involved your lift is, when you finish you're going to have to torque a number of bolts with weight on the wheels. The ramps will allow you to manueuver under the axles.

If you'll be changing a track bar, buy a pickle fork. A few good hits on the end of the fork and the tie rod end on the track bar will pop right off. This is much easier on you and your Jeep than trying to flail away on the mount or the tie rod end with just a hammer.

And get at least a 4 lb. hammer. Preferrably with a brass head. This tool is referred to as a BFH, or Big F**king Hammer. OK, a 4 lb. hammer is really an MFH, not a BFH.

Jerry
 
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Discussion Starter #5
:) Nice!

Thanks, I do have 4 lb MFH I use it for Geology, mineral hunts.

Thanks, I will look into the compressor and all the trimmings.

BAAM
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I only have a couple of things to add to the list. Get or borrow a good torque wrench and for drilling holes don't skimp on the drill bits, buy the titanium (good price), the high speed steels do not cut in well. Also when drilling a hole start with a small pilot hole and work your way up in sizes to the final size. This will not only make it easier to drill, but will give you a cleaner hole. I tried an experiment once with drilling up in sizes, and just drilling the size. Drilling up I had a much better fit, and the final hole was actually the correct diameter. Just drilling the hole ended with a lose fit and a slightly larger hole. I attributed it to centripital wobble of the drill bit as it bites into the metal. Not noticeable as you drill.

Ron
 

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Tool I use for Every lift I install:

standard imapct sockets (13/16" for LCA's,13/16" swivel for diff side, 5/8" UCA's, 1/2" shocks, 9/16" shocks, 3/4" & 15mm R shox, 1/2" upper rear shox, 15mm for bumpstop cup bolts, 18mm t-case skid, drill w/ necessary bits, taps, etc.)

I have installed just about nay lift you can name, you pretty much need the same stuff for all of them unless you find yourself cutting brackets, and drilling alot, thats when I woudl be sure to have air tools, I've burnt up too manyelectric drills and grinders....air wont get hot and burn up the motor:D.

That being said, I have installed MANY lifts using just hand tools as well. Although its alot less pleasant, it can be done. IN that case I woudl just make sure ot have a big ass pipe to break loose any stubborn fastners.

Also a torch, doesn't have to be anything special, sometimes a little propane torch will help heat up the nut enough to get it loose. and you don't want to start any job w/o PB blaster, and some never seize.


Take awhile to get all the right ools, especially when your trying to save for mods too. But if I have learned one thing over the years, doing the job w/o the right ool can be done, but after awhile isn't your time and stress worth something??? Alot of times its as simple as going to sears buying a given tool, and the job gets done....it sucks sometimes spending more $....but like I said, I am a firm believer int he right ool for the job! hope this helps.
 

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LOL, i forgot the basic **** too:

floorjack...i liek to have 2 around. Jackstands, many assorted size blocks of wood, big ass prybar, come along, and I can't forget my fav....my air chisel:D

BTW thought I woudl toss in: I have NEVER had to use a spring compressor. If you disconnect enough stuff you can cram anything in w/o using a compressor. Often the trouvble is getting things to line back up, especially when using OEM arms or trac bars, etc. thats where the come along comes in....get to know it well:D
 

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i've never HAD to use coil compressors either, just like i've never HAD to use air tools...or a come along for that matter. if you use compressors right, it makes the job much easier - probably quicker than disconnecting everything under the sun to get the springs in too.
 

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Mike Holmes said:
i've never HAD to use coil compressors either, just like i've never HAD to use air tools...or a come along for that matter. if you use compressors right, it makes the job much easier - probably quicker than disconnecting everything under the sun to get the springs in too.
Quicker isn't always the SAFEST way to go. Ever had a big ass coil pop out at you? I have, and its spooky! And I totally disagree about the come along( would love to see you think through some of the installs i've done w/o a come along)... If you have everything to replace OEM arms and such, then it won't be needed as much, but the more arms/trac bars, etc that you leave stock, the harder it is to get things to line back up. And even when you DO have all the right ****, you often have to use it on the last arm, seems liek the first 3 fall into place, and one is always a PITA. just my .02
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I've had a spring compressor fail, which resulted in a damaged quarter panel, broken finger, and the fire department to crush the spring so I could extract my hand. I had hoped for the a quiet arrival of the fire department (2 of them were already at my house), but no they had to show up with lights and siren, along with the Paramedics and cops. Gotta love friends. Worse thing was them taking pictures.

Ron
 

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PBR Stitch said:
I've had a spring compressor fail, which resulted in a damaged quarter panel, broken finger, and the fire department to crush the spring so I could extract my hand. I had hoped for the a quiet arrival of the fire department (2 of them were already at my house), but no they had to show up with lights and siren, along with the Paramedics and cops. Gotta love friends. Worse thing was them taking pictures.

Ron
Holy sh&t Ron...Glad that it was the quarter panel that took the blow and not you..

The best tool you can have is a friend... It is damn hard and dangerous to try and get a stubborn spring into place just by your self..
 

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1) Please point out where I said quicker was safest. Slower isn't always safest either now is it? Quicker is a by-product of using compressors, not the point of using them. And no, I haven't had a coil pop out at me. Maybe its in how I use the tool.

2) You "totally disagree" with me that I have never had to use a come-along? That makes no sense. Maybe you need to have something get loaded and spring out at you while using a come-along to scare you out of using them.

Dude, if you don't use them, thats great. Don't get silly with me because I do. Do it your way and I'll do it mine, why is that so hard for you?

SkyHighTJ said:
Quicker isn't always the SAFEST way to go. Ever had a big ass coil pop out at you? I have, and its spooky! And I totally disagree about the come along( would love to see you think through some of the installs i've done w/o a come along)... If you have everything to replace OEM arms and such, then it won't be needed as much, but the more arms/trac bars, etc that you leave stock, the harder it is to get things to line back up. And even when you DO have all the right ****, you often have to use it on the last arm, seems liek the first 3 fall into place, and one is always a PITA. just my .02
 
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Discussion Starter #14
The biggest thing about using any tool is knowing the hazards involved. Think about what could happen and how to prevent it. I think the buzz word is Operational Risk Management. My case it was easy, I wasn't very comfortable with the spring compressor, even though it was a brand new craftsman out of the box (first use). So I kept other people away from it, and kept the spring pointed in a safe direction. This was the final spring that I put in and even though I had already done 3 with it I was still being safe. It was scary when it let go, just heard a snap, then bang as the spring exploded into the quarter panel, breaking my finger and trapping my hand. Believe me it looked worse than it was. So whatever tool you use, weather it be come-along, spring compressor, 3 buddies and a prybar, just be safe and think about what can happen. I've worked around tools most of my life and have come to realize that being safe, useing your safety equipment really matters. If you use a come-along, make certain the straps are secure, can't slide and that the ratchet actually locks down. Spring compressors, even the good ones, watch where you point the spring and keep your fingers out of the coils and pinch points. Remember getting hurts decreases the amount of wheelin you can do, and doesn't earn any sympathy points with the significant other, just the head shake and finger wave. :D

Ron
 
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