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Discussion Starter #1
Most of you will probably laugh at me for this, but how do you go about installing additional relays? I want to wire up my 55watt reverse lights this weekend, and I am going to be putting some aux lights up front sometime soon. I think I am going to go with Lightforce, so I am going to need to build my own harness.

Anyway, whats the best way to go about adding relays to your Jeep without buying that $300 SPOD thing.. :) Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That makes sense. I have a few diagrams from this board that I found while searching, but that is deffinatly easier.

I am more curious about where to put, and how to mount, a new relay? Can you buy them with wires coming out of a "box" instead of having to plug them into something, or do I need to go to the junkyard and yank an old fuse box? Ive never wired a relay into a vehicle except for pre-made harnesses before , so I am not real sure how it works. Do I have to tear apart my existing fuse box and add wiring to the unused relay terminals?

Thank you very much for the offer, that was very kind. Your product looks awesome, please don't take offense to my post. I only meant that I am a 22 year old "kid" with college loans paying for a Rubi. A $300+ SPOD is a little out of the budget :D

By the way, have you been to other boards? There are definitely stupid questions, and other places are very quick to point that out :D
 

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JCS05Rubi said:
I am more curious about where to put, and how to mount, a new relay? Can you buy them with wires coming out of a "box" instead of having to plug them into something, or do I need to go to the junkyard and yank an old fuse box? Ive never wired a relay into a vehicle except for pre-made harnesses before , so I am not real sure how it works. Do I have to tear apart my existing fuse box and add wiring to the unused relay terminals?
The relays can be had with mounting tabs, or the relay sockets can be had with mounting tabs. Here's 2 tabbed relays mounted to the rad support with zip-ties.

 

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Re: This may be useful

No question is a "stupid" question....
Here is a basic wiring diagram that explains the Relay wiring for offroad lights.
The "A" configuration is probably what you want to use. PM me if you need any help or parts for your project (No charge)


Let me know if this helps.
Option B is a bad option for anyone since it'll put the entire load of the fog lights onto the headlight circuit and wiring.

It's also important to note the foglights are not to be wired in series as the diagrams show.
 

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Re: This may be useful

DoctorD said:
No question is a "stupid" question....
Here is a basic wiring diagram that explains the Relay wiring for offroad lights.
The "A" configuration is probably what you want to use. PM me if you need any help or parts for your project (No charge)


Let me know if this helps.
Option B is a bad option for anyone since it'll put the entire load of the fog lights onto the headlight circuit and wiring.

It's also important to note the foglights are not to be wired in series as the diagrams show.
Doc is correct, the fog amps should be wired in parallel with the 12V positive and the fog lamps should not pull power through the high-beam switch...

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Darnit. I knew I should have waited :D I went to radio shack early this morning during my "erands run." I grabed a 4 pole relay with a mounting tab, one of the 8 position barriers, some female quick disconnect things that plus into the spades on the relay, and some zip ties. I had wire at the house. The plan was to run the wires to the HVAC thing like I saw on here, use the quick disconnects to plug into the relay, and clamp them tight. Obviously some electrical tape will be used :D I did not see those relay mounts while I was there, that would have been a much better way to go :? Will my setup be ok for a week or two, untill I got some more spare cash to get the mounts, or do you all think its too unsafe to run the quick disconnects to plug into the relay?
 

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Yeh, I agree to on option "B" but that is why I stated using option "A". This was just a quick diagram I had handy.
JCS05Rubi, No offense taken, I totally understand the expense of adding components to a Jeep! Building it yourself keeps you on your toes. Education should be your number one priority! We need smart people here in the states to help keep jobs here at home instead of overseas!
I may have some parts we made to help you get started to keep all your relays together in one location if you like. ( We will rumage around).
As far as a box goes, well Radio Shack may have something that can be retro fitted to house the relays. But you are still going to have at least 4 wires for each relay that will be connected. You can purchase the relay sockets and relays on Ebay or your local auto parts store PM me for a parts list that I can e-mail to you.
I will give these to you for free if you like.




Also, please read this link below regarding back-up-lights:
http://www.stu-offroad.com/electrical/elec2/elec-2.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys, I am going to hold off doing it untill I get the right parts together. I think the disconnects on the relay would work, but i would rather do it right once. Besides, the KC 55 watts that I got from a buddy, dont have the stupid brackets anyway. All he gave me was the lights and the bolts that go horizontally in the light housing. Not much good with our bumper set up :D

You got a PM John
 

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I built this:



and mounted it here:



and control it with this:



I wire it like this:



Wiring diagram like this:

 

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My setup includes a main fuse from the battery to the main power block. Fuses for the individual items or circuit breakers notice them next to the toggle switches.
 

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Re: This may be useful

Ken White said:
DoctorD said:
[quote="[email protected]":3l780ioq]No question is a "stupid" question....
Here is a basic wiring diagram that explains the Relay wiring for offroad lights.
The "A" configuration is probably what you want to use. PM me if you need any help or parts for your project (No charge)


Let me know if this helps.
Option B is a bad option for anyone since it'll put the entire load of the fog lights onto the headlight circuit and wiring.

It's also important to note the foglights are not to be wired in series as the diagrams show.
Doc is correct, the fog amps should be wired in parallel with the 12V positive and the fog lamps should not pull power through the high-beam switch...

:)[/quote:3l780ioq]

They're pulling power through the low beams, the high beams are on the control side of the relay. The fogs are on the NC side and they receive power from the power provided for the low beams, which is a very bad idea on any vehicle made today.
 

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Here's my setup:



But it could be even better if done this way:




But if you're doing a whole new circuit overlay instead, I'd suggest jumpering terminals 30 to 86 on the new relay if the installer wishes to add a switch, and use the switch leg on the pin 85 side of the relay to ground. This way there's no need to tap into the interior for power and no need to run a power wire through the firewall, the switch can work the ground side of the relay. It's safer, cheaper AND easier.

Like this:

 

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Re: This may be useful

DoctorD said:
They're pulling power through the low beams, the high beams are on the control side of the relay. The fogs are on the NC side and they receive power from the power provided for the low beams, which is a very bad idea on any vehicle made today.
Doc, its really irrelevent whether the power is pulled from the high beam or low beam side since the lights should not be powered through a switch that doesn't have its switch contact ratings sized correctly...

As for switching the ground side as shown in your Figure A, it is better to switch the hot wire since there will be less wire length having 12VDC applied to it when it is not switched to the on position which means there is less chance of accidently shorting a wire/terminal out when testing or during a failure mode... Put the switch on the other side of pins 30/86 and fuse it as near to the 12VDC (+) terminal as possible.

:wink:
 

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Re: This may be useful

Ken White said:
DoctorD said:
They're pulling power through the low beams, the high beams are on the control side of the relay. The fogs are on the NC side and they receive power from the power provided for the low beams, which is a very bad idea on any vehicle made today.
Doc, its really irrelevent whether the power is pulled from the high beam or low beam side since the lights should not be powered through a switch that doesn't have its switch contact ratings sized correctly...
I had already agreed. :wink:

Ken White said:
As for switching the ground side as shown in your Figure A, it is better to switch the hot wire since there will be less wire length having 12VDC applied to it when it is not switched to the on position which means there is less chance of accidently shorting a wire/terminal out when testing or during a failure mode... Put the switch on the other side of pins 30/86 and fuse it as near to the 12VDC (+) terminal as possible.

:wink:
We can agree to disagree on this. The setup I posted can be located AT the battery, with ONE fuse and the trigger wire is safe unfused if done on the ground side. Then, a single 30A fused wire from battery to relay, short 1" jumper to the control side, and the output to the fogs is extremely simple and safe, the switch can be wired with 18ga and grounded to the dash bracket.

Switching the hot side requires a switch fuse and two "hot" wires...one 30A for the fog source and one 3A for the switch.
 

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Re: This may be useful

DoctorD said:
We can agree to disagree on this. The setup I posted can be located AT the battery, with ONE fuse and the trigger wire is safe unfused if done on the ground side. Then, a single 30A fused wire from battery to relay, short 1" jumper to the control side, and the output to the fogs is extremely simple and safe, the switch can be wired with 18ga and grounded to the dash bracket.

Switching the hot side requires a switch fuse and two "hot" wires...one 30A for the fog source and one 3A for the switch.
Doc, fuses are sized/used to protect the wiring insulation from melting if a short occurs. So even if you switch the ground, a smaller fuse should be used to ensure this larger gauge wiring is protected too. You can't rely on the coil in the relay to limit the current in the switch and wiring to a safe value - coils have been know to short across winding and contacts have been known to short across terminals...

You could also use one fuse if the same gauge wiring is used through out the installation...

I guess we will agree to disagree.

Have a Merry Christmas...

:D
 

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Re: This may be useful

Ken White said:
So even if you switch the ground, a smaller fuse should be used to ensure this larger gauge wiring is protected too. You can't rely on the coil in the relay to limit the current in the switch and wiring to a safe value - coils have been know to short across winding and contacts have been known to short across terminals...

You could also use one fuse if the same gauge wiring is used through out the installation...
That was the idea, but I see your point!

The ground switching does shorten the length of the "live" wires though.

Merry Christmas!
 
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