Rubicon Owners Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Jeepless in PA
Joined
·
12,585 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

I purchased a boat two years ago with my dad and while it is a bass boat, it is tricky to get into after taking a swim. This summer I went tubing with the girlfriend and we had to use the cavitation plate for a step up. That isn't nearly safe nor a good idea if thrown overboard with the engine on trolling.

My dad and I made this out of 1" solid box and tubing aluminum. The sides are 1x2" angle aluminum and there is a quick pin to hold the step up.

I have a millermatic 180, with the spoolgun and it is rated for 5/16 Al. We took a map gas 1lb solder torch, preheated it to 375-410 degrees and the welder on the max setting had good penetration. It is not pretty but is functional and will work as an emergency step.

The side tubing is for the shallow anchor (pole) to slide in.

The water line is where the 2" round black thing is located.

Thoughts?


It has 1x1x1" blocks to give it the standoff angle.



Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,425 Posts
Looks like you did a good job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Steps to enter the boat, OUT OF THE WATER.

Well gang,
I just cruised into this section of the forum and, was impressed by some of what I've seen and read. And that provoked me to show my latest little project with my boat, just before we got the Jeep. We recently acquired a 22.5" Kayot deck boat and, like many deck, pontoon and tritoon boats, due to the nature of them sitting so high on the trailer, it's sometimes almost impossible to gain access to the inside of them to perform maintenance, load or unload them etc.

So, I've seen many front-load, trailer mounted ladders on versions of these type and style of boats. So, I figured what the heck, I'll build one. it wasn't overly hard but, it did take a bit of calculating. It's primarily three types of metal. The mounting plate, the part that's used to attach to the ladder to the trailer, is 1/2" thick, 4" wide x 12" long, cold-rolled flat stock.

The hand rails are 1.25" x .150 wall hot rolled tubing. The hand rail was not ONE PIECE when I started. It was three pieces, that I had bent at a local metal fab shop, into different radius's, to be laid out, on top of each other, to piece together to make one long piece, that LOOKS like it was one piece, to begin with.

The steps, are 2" x 2" x 1/4" wall, hot rolled box tubing. I had to figure angle, height and rise to run, to end up with enough steps so that the rise between each one was not over powering. Well, there's a bit more to all the calculations and fitment, suffice to say, it was a fun project and, took a bit of head scratching. When it was all done, and mounted on the trailer for a test, I was really happy with the results.

I knew that the recycle/metal supply place had some tubing plugs for the step treads so, there was no need to box the ends up. Once the test was done and, I was thoroughly happy with the stability and strength, it was time to figure out what color for powder coating. I removed it and headed down to the local powder coater. I looked at some samples of color and came up with what you see in the pics. It's a Hammer-tone silver/black combo. I love it.

When it was done, powder coated, plugs in the ends of the steps, I added some self stick, non-skid to each tread. Done. In some of the pictures of the hand rail, you're looking at multiple welds, (remember, multiple pieces, pieced together, to form one long handrail) but, you cannot tell where the welds are at.

All of my friends think the handrail was one piece, bent to the specs and dimensions needed. Not so.

Now, entering and exiting that boat, while on it's trailer is ultra simple and less taxing, even while carrying equipment and or tools etc. Your thoughts?
Scott

P.S. This was all welded with a Millermatic 185 Mig welder. All the cuts, for ALL pieces of metal, were done with a Miller Spectrum 375 Extreme Plasma Cutter, including cutting the round tubing.







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Thanks John,
All my life I've wanted a nice, clean place to work. We moved from San Diego to Lake Havasu City AZ about 19 months ago and, I had that floor professionally epoxied prior to us moving in, during the time of closing. It's a brand new home and, that was the best time to do the floor. And, it gave me the chance to really set things up so I have a really nice and clean place to work.

It's really nice to be able to go out and even lay down on that floor, anywhere and do any form of work, and not get dirty etc. It gets mopped once a week.
Scott
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,112 Posts
excellent idea for ladder access to the boat !!


love the floor.....
my next home will have the floor epoxy`d completed before moving in.
:grin:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
excellent idea for ladder access to the boat !!


love the floor.....
my next home will have the floor epoxy`d completed before moving in.
:grin:
Yep,
That's specifically why I had ours done when I did. A brand new home, with brand new concrete in the drive ways and garage floors, has had no cars etc. parked on it, no tire marks, no oil dripped, NOTHING. So, while a pro still has to do quite a bit of prep, it's not nearly as hard as doing it with oil stains and all that. I love it and would do it again in a heartbeat.
Scot
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top