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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had to do an alignment after replacing all the rod ends and drag link. I'm assuming you already know something about creating a slight toe-in. My main goal is to show the mechanical setup. Lowering the vehicle almost gave me issues with my longer wrenches needed to secure the jam nuts, but I worked around it, and again made sure they were tight when I put the wheels back on.

I've tried measuring off the tread. Get's it done in a pinch, but it's pretty cave man accurate.
I've tried using angle iron bungeed to the tires. Still, issues could influence accuracy.

The method below was heavily influenced by BleepinJ*** I can't take credit. I did modify it to accomplish the same principles using resources I had on hand.

Chock the tires in the rear (I had a slight slope to the rear).
Remove the front tires.
Spin your hubs so the studs are in the same position on each side and best for placing your angle iron.
Set the front rotors down on ramps.
Secure your angle iron. I used shelving brackets that were straight and would not bend.
Verify each side matches.

The concave part of the shelving bracket is actually sitting on two of the wheel spacer studs. At first I tried securing the shelf support with a bungee, but it wasn't secure enough during measuring. I then devised a clamping method using the top stud with a lug nut. As the lug nut is tightened, the board clamps on the shelf support. I don't know how I would explain that without a picture.

Then measure front and back. Although I tried to measure the old tie rod and drag link lengths and replicate them, I still ended up with an inch of toe out.
I corrected toe-in to be no more than an eighth inch.
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Is the weight of the jeep on the brake rotors? Seems that would make tie rod adjustments difficult. I've done my own toe and caster adjustments successfully for years, confirmed by a couple of shop alignments. I've made some alignment bars out of 3" by 1" rectangular tubing that I cut and drilled to fit the wheel studs on my CJ and TJ. I make sure that the bars have the same orientation (level) and then get everything adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, the weight is on the rotors, but there’s less friction than a tire footprint and adjustment was easily done by hand. In my situation the tape measure routed easier too. I actually enjoyed the job; where as before, I dreaded it.

I guess It’s whatever strong and straight materials we can find to get the job done. I ordered the alignment tool that comes as a pair from BleepinJ***. It bolts directly to the studs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just got back from a desert trip and my Jeep was as if it was on rails, old tires and all. Shockingly pleased.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This alignment tool was offered for purchase on the site that taught the method above. I only put on one of the pair to get a look. I’ll incorporate them on the next alignment. The jack won’t be there blocking any measuring at that time.
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