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Took my Sig 9mm in for a trigger job ...
from factory "7lbs" to 3.25 lbs

The difference is incredible
198F35B9-2A5B-456E-9C0B-2B06DE6AFC4D.jpg

:wink2:
 

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Nice, who was shooting the scattergun on your right?
Tourist.. from Australia
never touched a gun before
Thankfully the range has a good guy watching them closely
:wink2:
 
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That's some good shooting Mac! Poor Aussies, I don't think they can own a handgun or a semi-auto rifle - all of their weapons were confiscated a few years ago.

I was shopping for a lighter and slimmer carry gun about a month ago at our local gun show, my Sig P239 was getting heavier and heavier on my hip every year. On my radar were two Sig models - the P938 and a P365. The P938 is the same size as my wife's P238 (.380 caliber) and a dandy size. I handled a P365 and liked it, then handled the just released P365XL which is a tad larger. Loved it, bought it.
 

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Considering the Romeo 0, John?
 

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I guess we'll have to name you Dead-Eye Mac!
Good Shooting, good to see you're keeping your skill set up to snuff!
:2gunfire:
 

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The “0” model is being made specifically for the XL evidently and is smaller. The price is also significantly less at $200.

I would think it would be attractive to people with vision issues. If you wear corrective lenses for instance. I can imagine if you find yourself needing to use this weapon there could be a high probability of your glasses not being available.
 
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Your rational makes sense Bill. That kind of sight would be fine on a nightstand gun but I wouldn't want it in my holster, like I wouldn't want a laser. I've shot thousands of rounds in various handguns and trying to adapt to a reflex sight I fear wouldn't work for me being an old dog and such :smile2:.

Back to the P938....

The P938 and its little twin the P238 (which I've shot quite a bit) has a very short sight radius and Mac's shot groups are very impressive. I don't think I've ever had a good group like Mac's with the wife's P238. My visiting nephew and I spent a recent afternoon shooting various long guns and handguns and I surprised myself when I had decent shot groups with the 238. Not as good as Mac's though.

The P938 was on my carry gun short list but it's so small I was afraid it wouldn't be fun to shoot in 9mm. I wish I could have shot one to try out.
 

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I was just trying to point out why some would put up with the added bulk.

My experience in the Army taught me that you will not fight in a range environment. I have difficulty with my old eyes focusing on both front and rear sight. One is a guess pretty much.

Anyone relying on corrective lessons should expect to not have them available when needed and train for such. This is just an arm chair exercise since I don’t carry, as you know.

I wonder what LEOs that require glasses are taught? They all seem to have iron sights. Maybe there is a minimum acceptable vision to be on the street.
 

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I've practiced pulling my gun and shooting a target as quickly as possible - all in one smooth motion. I'm shooting four or five rounds since I can't depend on the first one to get exactly on target. There's some muscle memory involved in pulling the gun, raising to high ready position in preparation to engage the target. Changing from a carry gun with a safety to one without gives me one less action to perform in a life threatening situation.

But you are exactly right - shooting performance at a range is very different from a real-life situation. I've thought about taking one of those personal defense weapon training classes but haven't done so. I've watched a bunch of training videos but watching and doing are two different situations.

Hopefully I'll never ever be in a life threatening situation where I need to pull my gun but I try to always be aware of my environment - high degree of situational awareness.
 

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I guess we'll have to name you Dead-Eye Mac!
Good Shooting, good to see you're keeping your skill set up to snuff!
:2gunfire:
Thanks Mario
the trigger job did all the correction - i'm happy with the results
i do need to practice more..as there are 8 out of the center :wink2:
 
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…..I have difficulty with my old eyes focusing on both front and rear sight. One is a guess pretty much.....
I always focus strictly on the front sight.. it's virtually impossible to focus on both. Am I wrong?

I'm not new to shooting by any means, been shooting firearms for at least 47 years... dad started me as soon as I could hold a gun. Also, I may not be Army trained, but, I fired expert with the M-16 and M-9 every time I qualified in my 22 year Air Force career. I currently shoot rifles and handguns quite regular in my backyard.
 

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^^Generally speaking you are correct about the front sight. It should be the only thing truly in focus.^^. That being said, there's too many scenarios for one simple technique. Practically speaking you will never even see your sights if you are in the unfortunate position to use a firearm to defend yourself. "Point and shoot". Not "JMHO". I don't even talk about sights to a new shooter until the 3rd time on the range.

Sig P938 looks to be a nice weapon. But, the best gun is always just like the best Bible translation. Pick the one you will read/carry. Now that is JMHO ?.
 

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I wonder what LEOs that require glasses are taught? They all seem to have iron sights. Maybe there is a minimum acceptable vision to be on the street.
I asked my brother - former military, retired LEO - he said..."show up with the eyes you need to hit the target"

He doesn't recall if there is a minimum vision requirement.
He is nearsighted, so he always has his contacts in.
 

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For target shooting you focus on the front sight with proper alignment (side to side and leveled height) with the rears. The benefit of a red dot on a pistol is faster target acquisition and shooting with both eyes open. Very few people outside of the military and law enforcement train to do this with iron sights. For the red dot it takes a lot of practice to be truly proficient with it in a life and death situation but all sight systems take that. A lot of us carry red dots on our duty weapons. I've found I can get on target quicker with it for the i intial shot or hold proper sight picture while keeping both eyes open and maintaining visual on surroundings. follow up shots are also quicker. It does add some bulk and really tales the time to practice.
 

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Thanks for the input. You bring up the good point of the improved situational awareness of having both eyes open. I can imagine it is difficult to break the habit of closing an eye.
 
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