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Been thinking about taking our Corgi's crate (cage) with us and securing it to the floor with a couple of ratchet straps and keeping her in the crate when we're off-road. If we ever do a flop, I don't want her flying around the cabin. She loves messing around streams when we stop for breaks and gets thoroughly wet and sometimes quite dirty, so I was thinking about keeping the crate as far aft as possible so we can open up the tailgate and put her right in the crate.

Any other ideas about keeping dogs somewhat restrained? (And no, we don't want to hold a wet dog in our lap!)
 

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John, nice to find fellow Corgi owners!

We have three!

We think the cage is the best method... and in the aft is great. We put them closer to the b-pillar because we lacked the rear part of the cage. We carry them in the tub, but the picture below is when we put them on the tonneau... a little high, but you get the idea.

Get a study cage and secure it in a way that the straps do not put too much stress on the wire frame. We find it can easily bend and break the welds on the cage itself.



With shade (on part of hell's revenge that is now closed):
 

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Hi to Corgi owner Fledge! I didn't see the third Corgi - guess it took that first picture :rotflmao: - they are pretty smart.

Looks like I'm thinking along the same track as you. Hadn't thought about distorting the crate by ratcheting the straps too tightly. Maybe I could use four struts/posts - one in each corner, cable-tie them to the cage and have the straps exert pressure on the struts and not the cage. Now I need to measure the crate to see if it will fit.
 

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They make dog seat belts as well. It's a harness that clips into the seat belt buckle. I've been looking to get a set for my pups...
 

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What I do is put a harness on the dohs and run the seatbelt to the harness in the rear. the dog can move around a bit but is secured in a roll. It is a padded harness and i attached a male seat belt part to the harness. so just clip the dog in. i originally thought about the cage idea but was worried that in a roll he would baouce around the cage and get hurt. he is a medium size dog though.
 

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The seat belt and harness idea is a good one - I'll have to think about that and the mechanics of getting the dog into the back near the seat belt. The crate we have will fit in the back, so it seems like we have two good options now. Thanks guys!
 

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We did the harness thing first with tethers anchored for the dogs so they could move. We didn't like the setup. Our corgis lime to find secure places when wheeling, wedging themselves in funny places... The cage gives them a solid place to bounce around and stay secure... Just my $.02.

One idea I have for the cage in the future is putting a platform (wood, maybe) on the bottom of the cage for the dogs to sit on. Then have holds coming up through the cage and bolting through the wood. Everything would be locked down an keeping the strain of the cage with straps.
 

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kidmugg said:
...One idea I have for the cage in the future is putting a platform (wood, maybe) on the bottom of the cage for the dogs to sit on. Then have holds coming up through the cage and bolting through the wood. Everything would be locked down an keeping the strain of the cage with straps.
yeah - there's an idea, I'll have to chew on that.
 

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Here's the setup I use with an 80 lb. lab. I clip him in either from above or below depending on whether I'm in town or offroading. If he sees the harness in my hand or hears me say "Jeep", he's ready to go!
 

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kidmugg said:
Here's all three in the cage... they really liked being crammed together to keep from rocking around too much.
That's a great picture! They are so expressive with their large eyes. My brother-in-law has two Corgis (one is the brother of ours) - sometimes all three are in his suv and they lay all over each other in the floorboard - they're funny.

Dioji said:
Here's the setup I use with an 80 lb. lab. I clip him in either from above or below depending on whether I'm in town or offroading. If he sees the harness in my hand or hears me say "Jeep", he's ready to go!
Our Corgi isn't crazy about riding, but she certainly doesn't mind it and loves to get out and explore when we're on a trail. She's only 28 pounds so I think a crate might be the best for her. We could tie a pillow to the inside of the crate top to make it pet-friendly when upside down :wink:
 

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John and Dale-

Not to hijack here, but how do you like your Corgi's??? How are they with young kids -2 yr old baby girl for instance??? Possibly newborn in the future, and with the kids growing up?

I've always been a "big dog" kinda guy with labs all my life, bouvier de flounders (sp???), husky's, malamutes, etc. Our current lab mix is getting up there in his years and has been solo since we lost our last Great Pyrenese to cancer. Wife is thinking of another dog, only something smaller this time that would be good with kids and fun to take places. I've seen Dale's pups out on the trail in many pictures and I think in a few creeks here and there perhaps along the way??? All pics of course, but got me thinking you don't see them every day, not everybody and their brother has one like a lab. Knowing Dale has a new baby now, how are the dogs taking things? How are they with the family?

Guess I should have PM'd you guys-feel free either way. Sorry for the thread-jack.

To relate, our lab doesn't much care for trail rides in the Jeep as he gets bounced around too much now that he's older. He LOVES going for rides in town to get coffee (he gets free treats or whip cream :laugh: ) but trail rides aren't his favorite until he gets OUT of the Jeep, then he's loving life again. The Pyrenese however-she LOVED the Jeep. Anywhere and everywhere we went, she loved riding along. Never had any trouble getting bounced or jossled around and when the lab did, she'd just give him that "you idiot" look of disgust, then turn to me for more. They're just too big though to carry gear, equipment, supplies and the two big dogs everywhere. Maybe downsizing isn't such a bad idea. I like the cage idea best and we actually use those type of things for my parent's McNabb and my sisters Blue-Tick Hound on the ranch trucks when hauling them around. The kennel/cage things feel "safe" to them with their blankets inside and they ride better that way. I think it's safer for them not only inside for themselves, but helps keep other stuff from falling on them at the same time-protection in more ways than one with the cage setup. Both have been in the cage when multiple rolls of barbed wire have banged up against the sides, or posts, fencing supplies, etc., and they couldn't care less as they're safe inside. Just a thought.

Best of Luck,

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #13
[quote='05TJLWBRUBY]Not to hijack here, but how do you like your Corgi's??? How are they with young kids -2 yr old baby girl for instance??? Possibly newborn in the future, and with the kids growing up? [/quote]No worries about the thread drift Mike.

A two year old might be a bit too rambunctious for a puppy. My niece (has a rug rat) got a Corgi puppy from the same breeder that ours and my B-I-L's came from and it just didn't work out. They gave the puppy back to the breeder after a couple of months, her son was just a little too wild and crazy with the pup. I think the primary concern would be the relationship with the kid to the Corgi puppy, and not the Corgi puppy to the kid.

You could do some reading and ask the question on the Corgi forum. There's at least one breeder that is very active over there and might have some good advice. You could also get an adult Corgi - you would miss the house-breaking and chewing stage. We got ours when she was seven years old (about a year ago - she's not a rescue though.) Here's our Corgi's web page - Sassy was the breeder's first champion.

Corgi's are very smart - almost a little too smart, I think ours is sometimes like a rebellious teenager and won't obey commands, or obey them quickly. Females in particular can be stubborn (okay - no jokes here :laugh: .) They are an ideal pet, have a great disposition and temperament and unlike other herding dogs (Corgi is the oldest herding breed) won't go nuts if they aren't constantly busy.

With their short legs they have a very low center of gravity - ideal for wheeling :cheesy: . The only downside is they are constantly shedding and some of them blow their coats a couple of times a year.
 

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Two downsides of Corgis... dental maintenance and shedding (as john mentioned). They are great for everything else, considered well-rounded dogs like labs (though labs are the most registered dog in the AKC).

We have Lucy (the bitch) and two of her pups. She had all girls. The pups are now five years old. Each has their own personality. Lucy is GREAT with kids. Victoria is too... Jane is more hesitant and hates being cornered and will nip. So among three corgis, two are good with children. Pups will be pups no matter what breed you have.

I like corgis because they are a big dog in a smaller body (about 30 lbs). They have a bigger bark than you expect in a compact frame and will not back down to predators, other dogs, or bad guys. That's why we originally got them. Then are fine in the house and love running outside. They do like to get in lots of exercise but do not go nuts when they don't get in a daily walk.

My understanding is that, as herders, they are best used for anti-herding... meaning, they like to chase things away off of your property. They will get in fights with dogs three times their size if they feel threatened.

Corgis are known to be very smart (I think they are in the top ten of smart breeds), but not all are the same smarts. Victoria is our most submissive and stupid. She's actually my favorite because she's dumber than the others and sticks close to me (heels naturally) on walks. She's also the best tracker and runs the fastest. Jane and Lucy will leave you like a bad relationship if another dog or fox or rabbit or squirrel or cat... crosses our path. Part of this is having three. Three is a challenge as they imitate each other. If one barks they all bark. If one darts they all dart. We've been complimented for having three well behaved corgis... even when we feel like failures with them. Sooo, having three is a different kind of challenge.

Lucy will do the normal tricks: sit, lay, rollover, fetch, speak... the others will sit and lay down. They don't play fetch with a stick. They fetch and herd Lucy when Lucy chases the stick. This is because it's hard to train three dogs separately.

I think they are great breed for children and are also used as service dogs. But, like all breeds, each has their own personality. If you get a Victoria, you get a loyal and dumb dog that you will love to death. If you get Lucy, you've got a smart and loyal dog that will work for you and jump at every chance to ride in the jeep. If you get Jane, you get a dog demanding to be petted at every hour (co-dependent issues) and smart enough to do her own thing.

As for jeeping, they all like to tuck themselves into secure places when offroad... they like the cage for this, and they go to sleep. Seriously, they conk out within 10 minutes on the trail and only wake up when we stop. They love running around... Victoria and Jane will run through water and Lucy will not, keeping her paws pristine like royalty. She hates water. That's why she's called "Lady Lucy" on her papers... actually, they are all "Lady" for their first names. The queen of england has a bunch and it seemed fitting.

We were hoping to breed Victoria and Jane (as we did Lucy) as they are descended from multiple champions but it's too much work for the payout... plus, who wants to put diapers on their dog twice a year... :laugh:

PM me if you have more questions... :)
 

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Dioji said:
Here's the setup I use with an 80 lb. lab. I clip him in either from above or below depending on whether I'm in town or offroading. If he sees the harness in my hand or hears me say "Jeep", he's ready to go!
Where did you get the harness? I like the look of it.
 

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Duct tape!
Just kidding!....I have a dog (mut) named Rubi and if I say "Jeep" she's ready for a ride!
 

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Filthy-Beast said:
Dioji said:
Here's the setup I use with an 80 lb. lab. I clip him in either from above or below depending on whether I'm in town or offroading. If he sees the harness in my hand or hears me say "Jeep", he's ready to go!
Where did you get the harness? I like the look of it.
I bought the harness at a local feed store where they had pet stuff. Go online and search for Kurgo harness. I'd purchased another one from Petco or Petsmart which had white fleecy padding. It didn't fit him nearly as well, soaked up water and was always really nasty looking.
 
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