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Here is a short how-to on installing a gas tank skid plate. I completely forgot to take pictures during this install until after but hopefully you can follow the instructions well enough. If enough requests are made I'll take some more pictures of everything.

NOTE:This info applies to most wranglers in the TJ flavor;
also, my Jeep has an already installed body lift so the gas tank skid will be assembled using the upper bolt holes in the brackets.

Prep: If your Jeep has the notorious fuel burping issue now would be a good time to swap in the GM hose. DRAIN THE FUEL TANK AS MUSH AS POSSIBLE BEFORE REMOVAL!!! This will help when you go to remove the tank from the original skid plate.

Step 1: Pull the fuel pump relay, start the Jeep and wait until it sputters out. This will help keep fuel from covering you as you pull the fuel lines.

Step 2: Disconnect the battery, feed and return lines from the tank, fuel filler hose and the hose that connects the tank to the EVAP canister.

Step 3: Place a jack under the tank with a block of wood (this is where a second pair of hands will be helpful) and place some pressure on the tank skid. Remove the nuts from the studs and save them for later.

Step 4: Slowly lower the tank and keep it balanced on the jack while ensuring not to drop it fully from the jeep. This is where some jeeps will differ...I had to lower my tank first to remove the sending unit connector but some years have another connector near the fuel line disconnects so just make sure you don't drop the tank with the wiring connected.

Step 5: Assemble the gas tank skid and strap system on the Savvy skid. Remove the gas tank from the old skid by loosening the original straps (these are usually so corroded they break apart) and take the time to thoroughly clean the gas tank. This will help you with installation into the new skid.

Step 6: Lower the CLEAN gas tank into the Savvy skid and push down as hard as you can to get it to seat fully, tighten the straps and put the whole assembly back on the Jack. NOTE: If you are having difficulty getting the small aluminum barrel nuts to engage the threads while you squeeze the straps together try squeezing them to form around the barrel nuts.

Step 7: Position the jack and gas tank skid assembly back underneath the rig and raise it up being mindful of hoses and wires. Connect the sending unit wiring before you go all the way up and check for clearances. (This is where I had to make a slight modification the the skid in order to get it to fit fully flush on the cross-member, see pics)

Step 8: Install all of the hardware to mount the tank and hook up the filler hose. Reinstall the fuel pump relay and battery. NOTE: If you are changing to the GM hose remove the feed neck and fill hose. Reinstall the feed neck and then measure how much to cut on each side keeping in mind you want the flapper valve to be centered between the tank and filler neck. The GM hose is smaller in diameter than the Jeep hose so install of this is a huge PITA. Eat your Wheaties before attempting.

Now that you have everything buttoned up go use it!
 

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How much does this skid weigh and how much extra clearance do you get over stock?
 

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If I remember correctly their specs say there is a net weight increase of four pounds, and with a body lift you gain two inches clearance improvement.
 

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Good write-up, thanks. For step 6 - getting the gas tank into the skid, you might need a rubber mallet to beat the tank into the skid. It's a very tight fit, but a perfect fit. I swapped my Rokmen steel skid for the Savvy one about a year ago and saved quite a few pounds over the steel version.

If you are going to be playing in the rocks, you need protection for the fuel tank (and engine oil pan/tranny/etc.)
 

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Good write-up, thanks. For step 6 - getting the gas tank into the skid, you might need a rubber mallet to beat the tank into the skid. It's a very tight fit, but a perfect fit. I swapped my Rokmen steel skid for the Savvy one about a year ago and saved quite a few pounds over the steel version.

If you are going to be playing in the rocks, you need protection for the fuel tank (and engine oil pan/tranny/etc.)
I just stood on the corners of mine haha. Okay maybe jumped a little. Either way the Savvy GTS is awesome. My rear limiting factor is no longer my gas tank but my hitch.



 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good write-up, thanks. For step 6 - getting the gas tank into the skid, you might need a rubber mallet to beat the tank into the skid. It's a very tight fit, but a perfect fit. I swapped my Rokmen steel skid for the Savvy one about a year ago and saved quite a few pounds over the steel version.

If you are going to be playing in the rocks, you need protection for the fuel tank (and engine oil pan/tranny/etc.)
My #1 rule whenever I start a build or suggest parts to buy is armor the critical areas first, then add the fun stuff. Hopefully this will help someone save a few bucks by doing it on their own.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
How much does this skid weigh and how much extra clearance do you get over stock?
Here are the specs from Savvy's website

- 3/16" 6061 T-6
- Dual height mounts
- Installs with or without a body lift
- Corrosion resistant materials
- Weighs 32 pounds complete
- Form fit to the tank
 

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If you do much playing in the rocks, you will be dragging your hitch receiver, a lot.
I don't so not worried there but last year in Colorado I did land on it coming off a couple ledges. While I am aware that it is my limiting factor I am not currently in a financial position to replace it with a bumper that has an integrated one that is rated. I don't own a truck so I have to use my Jeep for towing. So, until the market shifts back to industry's favor I am stuck with it. It's okay though, it helps protect the bottom of my super expensive rear bumper :grin2: haha
 

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Well, I sent pictures of it in February and I basically got the run around.
That is because it hasn't failed yet. I wouldn't do it but if one did decide to get a bit technical about it, as long as it holds the tank in place, protects it from leaking out any fuel, and isn't collapsed enough on the bottom to affect the pump, it is still doing the job it was designed to do.
 
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