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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In light of all my previous questions, I am just going to be getting 31 in tires for now. I am going to put together a wish list for when some money can be saved up. I am looking at the Rocky Road Trailblazer lift kit which is a 4" kit that utilizes OME springs. Here is a link http://www.rocky-road.com/tjtrailblazer.html what do you think? The price is good and they have a really great write up. I would like to upgrade what Needs to be upgraded to run a 4in lift but am still really unsure because i have gotten a bunch of different opinions. I want to make a list of everything and the best components to run so i can buy them over time. I dont want it be randomly put together. You all have given me alot of great info and saved me ALOT of money. So any and all comments are appreciated.

Do I need Quick disconects right away or are they somthing that i can put on later?

Do I need bumpstop extensions?

Are the Rancho 9000 shocks worth the 200 extra dollars?

Should i get a longer trackbar or can it wait?

These type of questions and more are what i am trying to answer.
 

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After reading the propaganda this is on that site.....i would steer clear! My god, just reading that makes me what to WARN ALL WITH LONG ARM KITS! :roll:

You are paying $700 for 4 springs, 4 (rebranded) cheap shocks, 2 adjustable trac bars (whos guess on thier quality) and some spacers for the t-case. As for the "shock mounts". I don't know about anyone else, but I haven't run into a shock clearance issue. Where are the (at least) lower control arms? Since when does a lift kit NOT come with bump stop extensions? If they are supplying a track bar, why even make that comment about the drop pitman arm.

In my opinion, which isn't worth too much :rotflmao: Looking back at your other post...if you want to run some 265s, which are typically a 32" tires, the budget boost you have on there is more than capable. I ran the same thing on plenty of rock crawls and did just fine. I would save more money and look into a quality kit. Anything that is a 4" kit that doesn't even include lower arms should raise flags!

As far as disconects go...definately a good idea. You would be surprised howo much your swaybar will limit your flex offroad.
 

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My advice: Build slow, spend wisely

Don't be in a hurry, things cost bc they are worth the cost. Adjustable control arms will ride better, handle better, and flex better. They won't put as much strain on the weak failure prone brackets. Buying quality joints means less down time replacing crappy ones. A good shock can change your jeeps ride and handling dramatically. So will a quality spring. Dunno how old you are, but after a 4 hour drive you'll wish youdve done it right when you need your back realigned. I would go antirock or the equivalent. It's worth it in the long run and cheaper not buying things twice.

On this site you'll learn people aren't buying parts to say the run them. Rather bc they work best.

Spend right do it once

Control arms: Rokmen, Clayton, JKS, or Currie
Springs: AEV/Nth or OME
Shocks: Bilstien, Fox, OME
Track bars: Currie or Clayton
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks, Im almost 29 so still young for now. I dont mind paying for quality, just asking yall first so I dont buy crap. That is also why i am attempting to do research and wade through all the propaganda on the internet. I want a well thought out plan of attack so when the funds come in I will already know what and where to buy.

I really would like to run 33's on my jeep, and I need new tires like yesterday. I have been contimplating a 1 1/4 in body lift. I figure this will get me through the winter where i wont be doing too much off road just mostly onroad and highway. What are yalls feeling on body lifts? Any particular brand/material better than the others?

Northridge4x4 sells JKS 1 1/4 made out of 94 durameter solid Durathane and M.O.R.E. which is made out of aluminum. Both brands are held in high regards from what i have read.
 

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I can't think of anything to add to what has been said. But I will second what the others have said. You get what you pay for, and this is not a cheap hobby. Choose wisely, research well, and ask questions! As for this brand up above.... I have not ever heard anything great about them.
 

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To the lift you mentioned....if you're wanting to run 33's, a 4" lift is too big. If you want to go the non-budget boost, you will want no more than a 3" suspension lift to accomplish what you want. This will leave the geometry of everything where they need to be.

Good luck and take your time.

Happy Modding.
 

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If you only plan on 33's right now, id put on a jks body lift and motor mount lift. With your current budget boost spacers you will be fine thru the winter until you can upgrade your suspension.
 

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Thats what I would do. Trust me, im on 4.5" springs now and can't wait to go back down. Just a few more $$'s and i can order my Rokmen fenders.
 

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Jeepless in PA
06 rubi
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12,594 Posts
Almost as bad as poor quality springs and shocks nowadays are some of the "long arm" kits that are on the market. Many of these kits do not allow your front axle to cycle up and down in the manner it was designed for which is why they handle so spooky at highway speeds. Long-arm kits are cheap to make, easy to for a shop to make profit on, and horrible at highway speeds. But they do look super-cool parked in a picture which is why the current hype.

Long arm kits are fine for vehicles trailered to the trails. If you want to keep your vehicle and passenger's safe though, stay away from this latest fad as the rotating castor on these systems makes for screwy handling. Long arm kits make your Jeep turn like a skateboards (picture pivoting axles). Your life is worth more than an extra inch or two of suspension flex on the trail. Expert editors from various suspension magazines agree as well... Stay safe, avoid the long-arm systems.



Putting the fear of death into a buyer is one way for them to buy your product.
 
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