Rubicon Owners Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
560 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Or rather snatch ring.
I picked this up on Friday and tried it out yesterday. Works like a charm with no damage to the ring or synthetic shackle. It’s designed to work with synthetic rope and shackle
For reference, a Warn snatch block with shackle weighs over 9 lbs.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
560 Posts
Discussion Starter #6

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,883 Posts
These rings are not usable with wire rope. My winch is on it's third Jeep and the wire rope from 1988 is still perfectly usable because I have cared for it properly. I am not intersted in specialized gear only I can use, because I try to never go on the trail alone.

Note that I have now seen multiple synthetic rope failures, and while the rebound didn't happen as advertized, the ropes obviously don't have the same strength they had when new. In one case, the Chevy being winched rolled back and munched a fender on a boulder. A bystander who should have known better stepped to the side and was not killed.

YES I understand that these failures probably represent relatively old synthetic ropes, with questionable UV stabilizers, and that they may have been abused, and they probably were baking in the sun for a decade or more. But I also picked up a new $25 Warn brand wire rope in 1992 for my 1988 winch, and it's still in a plastic bag in my garage, because the original owner replaced it when new with a synthetic. I expected to need it and never have, in fact the XD9000i winch now gets used more for landscaping than vehicle recovery.

My care has included unspooling, inspecting, and lubricating this wire rope, and then re-spooling it, about once every 5 years. Also, I replaced the original open hook with a snap hook, because I wanted to.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
481 Posts
Speaking of synthetic winch rope.. how often should you change it? Is there a safe way to test it without destroying it.. or just waiting for it to fail? Things to look for?

Also, what rope do people recommend? I have a Zeon 10-S Platinum with a 3 year old rope on it now.. and I'm wondering if it's time? I've used it maybe ~8 times rescuing others.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
Speaking of synthetic winch rope.. how often should you change it? Is there a safe way to test it without destroying it.. or just waiting for it to fail? Things to look for?

Also, what rope do people recommend? I have a Zeon 10-S Platinum with a 3 year old rope on it now.. and I'm wondering if it's time? I've used it maybe ~8 times rescuing others.
I think the two biggest factors affecting longevity of winch rope are dirt/mud and the sun's UV rays. If its been exposed to either for a while, that portion of the rope may be weakened. My winch rope is about 9 years old, but is doing fine since I usually have it covered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
I have a cover for my winch also. It doesn't help for the end near the hook though. I will probably change my line next year. The old line will still be usefully, I am always looking for some rope.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,777 Posts
If there's no bearings and just a block of machined/cast/forged aluminum I would think that's a possibility. Most of the recovery situations I've been involved with are usually short pulls - somebody flopped and they just need to be flipped back to four on the ground. There have been some very long pulls where I think a device like this would be completely unsuitable.

Thinking here... there's going to be some loss of efficiency due to friction. The reason I use a snatch block is a) necessary due to straight pull from the winch is impossible or b) I need to increase the pull power. I had to winch a very high centered 4-door off an obstacle and my 10.5k hydraulic winch was struggling so a snatch block to the rescue.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
560 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Keep in mind the melting point of synthetic rope is at least 300 degrees Fahrenheit and the aluminum ring makes a great heatsink.
Also, if the aluminum gets hot enough to melt the rope then it would be more than hot enouh for water to sizzle off of, does anybody really think the ring will get that hot?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,369 Posts
Keep in mind the melting point of synthetic rope is at least 300 degrees Fahrenheit and the aluminum ring makes a great heatsink.
Also, if the aluminum gets hot enough to melt the rope then it would be more than hot enouh for water to sizzle off of, does anybody really think the ring will get that hot?
Quite true. I am not sure if it would ever build up this kind of heat. But even if it is a possibility, I would say it would be an unusual occurrence/situation.

Course I am looking at this as the rope(s) affixed to a stationary object and connecting through the center of the ring building up the heat. IF the friction ever became so great for whatever reason that the rope being used for the actual pull started to slide on the ring instead of the rope(s) going through the center of the ring, that might build up heat a lot quicker (larger area for friction to take place).

Here is an additional video with commentary
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,777 Posts
Keep in mind the melting point of synthetic rope is at least 300 degrees Fahrenheit and the aluminum ring makes a great heatsink.
Also, if the aluminum gets hot enough to melt the rope then it would be more than hot enouh for water to sizzle off of, does anybody really think the ring will get that hot?
This is a very interesting product and I'm not trying to be hypercritical of it. I think it would make a good addition to a recovery kit but for me it will never replace the traditional ball bearing snatch block for those long pulls or where max pull force is required. I think it's highly unlikely friction would cause any heat buildup but friction will reduce the force applied to the towed object. Another point is the tight radius the line needs to make - a more gentle radius would be kinder to the line.

Just thought of another point - sometimes it's not obvious when you will need a snatch block in a recovery situation. With the traditional snatch block you can open up the block and put it on the extended winch line. With this ring, that's not possible (unless I'm clueless how this thing works.)

In summary, for short, easy and predictable pulls I think it would work fine and its light weight is a bonus. My snatch block is very heavy and usually lives in the bottom of my recovery bag, this little guy could be bungeed anywhere in the back for quick access.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
481 Posts
Quite true. I am not sure if it would ever build up this kind of heat. But even if it is a possibility, I would say it would be an unusual occurrence/situation.

Course I am looking at this as the rope(s) affixed to a stationary object and connecting through the center of the ring building up the heat. IF the friction ever became so great for whatever reason that the rope being used for the actual pull started to slide on the ring instead of the rope(s) going through the center of the ring, that might build up heat a lot quicker (larger area for friction to take place).

Here is an additional video with commentary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Blgt28NTnCU
I like that video. The guy seems very pragmatic. He acknowledges all the concerns raised in this thread and then some. He doesn't seem to act like they aren't a concern... but more of a use your own judgment attitude.

Yes, there will be friction.
Yes, heat buildup was/is a concern.
etc...


Mr. Canfield,

I agree with you. In essence, use the right tool for the job. Using these rings solo or in series may or may not be the right decision. Acknowledge and understand your surroundings, consider your goal... make the wisest decision in that circumstance with the tools you have at your disposal. For me this is another tool to potentially makes things safer. My #1 goal in recovery is always the safety of myself and others around me. If it doesn't meet that goal, then it goes in the trash. I wouldn't give it to my worst enemy if I didn't think it was safe.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top