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Discussion Starter #1
Okay... This is probably a super newbie question, but I've really never messed much with jeep suspension.

The other day I saw a Jeep with what I'm assuming are bars for axle wrap elimination. I know the Rubicon has a version of this already, but I'm trying to learn (I'm actually thinking about fabricating something for my CJ one day).

The TJ had a bar that went from the frame to a bracket on the axle tube. This was repeated on the other side of the jeep as well.

So, my question is...if the axle drops during articulation, doesn't the distance of that rod need to change? Otherwise it seems the axle wrap bar would pull the axle to the center of the vehicle as the axle drops. The ones I was looking at were a set length.

Am I missing something here?
 

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Jeepless in PA
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Coil spring systems do not have axle wrap, only leaf springs. What you saw on the TJ might have been a custom trackbar, trilink system or radius arm. On a leaf spring system, the ladder bar or 4 link is set to a fixed distance in order to overcome the pressure of axle wrap and wheel hop.



edit-


Here is a site with pictures:

http://www.4x4wire.com/jeep/tech/susp/axlewrap/
 

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rubi rick said:
What version of this does the Rubicon have? I am not sure what you are referring to.
The TJ Jeeps, all Wranglers since '97?, have a 4 link coil spring suspension front and rear. From '41 through '96 all Jeeps had leaf springs front and rear. The geometry of the 4 link eliminates any possible axle wrap. Leaf springs are notorious for axle wrap on acceleration and deceleration. The link you saw on the YJ is available from a couple after market outlets. The link above is referring to leaf springs only.
 

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rubi rick said:
What version of this does the Rubicon have? I am not sure what you are referring to.
Maybe you saw this.




Nth Degree had a similar deal, but I don't think it's built any longer
 

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Red06LJ said:
Okay..
The TJ had a bar that went from the frame to a bracket on the axle tube. This was repeated on the other side of the jeep as well.

So, my question is...if the axle drops during articulation, doesn't the distance of that rod need to change? Otherwise it seems the axle wrap bar would pull the axle to the center of the vehicle as the axle drops. The ones I was looking at were a set length.

Am I missing something here?
The other thing you may have seen is a long arm suspension. I am saying this as you say the bars were on both sides. If you look under your Jeep you will see you have bars on both sides as well. It's just on a long arm the bars are more visible. And yes, as the axle drops the wheelbase gets shorter. This is the reason many go to long arm because as the axle drops the longer arms don't need to travel as far. The Nth Degree stinger above is used in place of the upper control arms to allow more suspension travel and to keep the pinion shaft of the axle aimed straight at the transmission all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
:) My ignorance in suspension is really shining through here!

Bob, I suspect you are right.

My 06 Rubicon has the factory bars that come off the frame and attach to the axle tube. This jeep was a regular TJ (not Rubicon) and they were aftermarket. They were much longer than the ones on the Rubicon, but seemed to do the same general thing. I was just wondering what it really did.

I still have a lot to learn with suspension in general.

Thank you for the comments. I'm going to go ponder this and, perhaps, return with more questions after a good round of googling. :)
 

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Red06LJ said:
:) My ignorance in suspension is really shining through here!

Bob, I suspect you are right.

My 06 Rubicon has the factory bars that come off the frame and attach to the axle tube. This jeep was a regular TJ (not Rubicon) and they were aftermarket. They were much longer than the ones on the Rubicon, but seemed to do the same general thing. I was just wondering what it really did.

I still have a lot to learn with suspension in general.

Thank you for the comments. I'm going to go ponder this and, perhaps, return with more questions after a good round of googling. :)
Do a search for long arm and short arm suspension for Jeep. I think a lot of folks back a couple years ago really went for the long arm set-ups. Today more are going for a lower center of gravity short arm deal. Currie and Rokmen sell pretty nice arms.
 

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The arms you are describing are the rear lower arms. In this application, they would be considered a long arm setup. The arms that form the "V" are the upper arms. This lower and upper arrangement is a single triangulated suspension. The lower arms set the axle in its place, while the upper arms control the side to side and rotational forces on the axle. Going this way, the suspension doesn't need a track bar.
 
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