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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

I have a new maintenance project that I'm unsure how to tackle. I have a 2003 rubicon whose future is to be trailered to off-road parks probably 2x/year. I suspect the maximum speed this jeep will now ever see is 30 mph, and that it will have less than 30 miles total/year driven. It's unlikely that the Jeep will ever see streets again.

I'm familiar with how to maintain vehicles when they are driven regularly, but I'd like some suggestions for this new maintenance project. Could someone suggest to me the things I should do?

Thanks!

-kehyler
 

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Use a battery maintainer.
Put Stabil in the fuel and have a full tank.
Start it monthly, make sure the engine comes up to normal operating temperature and drive it around the block so the tires don’t flat spot.
Tires should be inflated to the max pressure as shown on the sidewalls.

Hopefully you can keep it inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Use a battery maintainer.
Put Stabil in the fuel and have a full tank.
Start it monthly, make sure the engine comes up to normal operating temperature and drive it around the block so the tires don’t flat spot.
Tires should be inflated to the max pressure as shown on the sidewalls.

Hopefully you can keep it inside.
I can only do outside at the moment, does alter your advice? Are there ways to combat rodents?
 

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I always keep the Camaro on jack stands(it's the only car that really sits), and pull the stem cores out if it's going to be parked for longer than a few months. Tires don't like to be on the ground for long periods of time unless they are rotated occasionally :p As mentioned fuel stabilizer and a battery tender if you don't have a cut off. I would just put in a cut off/disconnect as dealing with a tender is a pain in the ass as you also have to be a minder. If you have to have it on the ground, those little furniture dolly looking gizmos make moving it around easy without starting it. If it's outside, starting it every week will keep all the seals in good order. If its an auto, I would definitely drive it at least once every month or two as auto transmissions have been known to have issues from sitting. The last thing you want is to find yourself dropping the trans or trying crap like trans-x because it's stuck in first or the only way it will shift is by letting off the gas between each gear.
 

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…….as dealing with a tender is a pain in the ass as you also have to be a minder......
If I am understanding this comment correctly, you are saying you have to watch or check on the battery tender? Not the one I suggested above. It is designed to be connected and left. It will slow charge and when it reaches a certain level stop and just maintain the battery. It will not overcharge. It can be connected 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year without ever monitoring it yourself.
Even a battery with a disconnect will go dead. I have an extra battery sitting in the garage I put the Battery Tender on for a couple days a week among infrequently driven vehicles. I only have one Battery Tender so it gets passed around like a high school cheerleader after a football game.

As far a mice... my wife swears cotton balls soaked in peppermint oil keeps them away.
 

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I've had bad luck with the Battery Tender brand, had a couple of them die on me. For several years I've used Yuasa battery float chargers and use one on my Rubi, the mower, generator, etc. Never had one fail.

I try to get Rubi out of the shop once a month but sometimes that slips to once a quarter :serious:
 

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The only Battery Tender I’ve had an issue with is the one where the unit itself plugs into the wall. I have been using the ones like Geroux shows below on my motorhome for years with no issues. I also have a double unit that I keep my Jeep and wife’s Subaru hooked to all the time because both sit a lot. Like everything it seems, you’re bound to have a failure now and then.

To your outside in Minnesota storage issue:

Get a good cover.
Get wheel covers like the ones used on RV’s

Put a couple of mousetrap’s underneath it along with the other suggestions.
 

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If I am understanding this comment correctly, you are saying you have to watch or check on the battery tender? Not the one I suggested above. It is designed to be connected and left. It will slow charge and when it reaches a certain level stop and just maintain the battery. It will not overcharge. It can be connected 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year without ever monitoring it yourself.
Even a battery with a disconnect will go dead. I have an extra battery sitting in the garage I put the Battery Tender on for a couple days a week among infrequently driven vehicles. I only have one Battery Tender so it gets passed around like a high school cheerleader after a football game.

As far a mice... my wife swears cotton balls soaked in peppermint oil keeps them away.
Not necessarily watch it, but check on it periodically. I haven't used one in years so perhaps they are better now, however twice in the past I had found the battery with the darn caps popped off and quite a mess. This might also be an Arizona issue as it gets damn warm in the shop. As for the disconnect if you have a decent battery I have had no issues turning over the 502 as far out as 7 or 8 months.
 

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Don't use a traditional wet battery, get an Optima AGM type - no electrolyte to boil out. The Yusa float chargers I use have never overcharged any batteries but I do take a look every so often.
Some battery tenders are not capable of maintaining an AGM battery. If you do use an AGM battery, make sure to get a charger/tender that has a setting for AGM-type.
 

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This is my outdoor storage solution, well a couple of them. I had some rodent issues and went with these a few months back. They are not that expensive especially compared to rodent issues. You drive onto the base, then roll the cover out over the vehicle. Then zip it up and plug it in. I have plans to add a battery charger and run the g=fans off the battery and charger. I picked outdoor chargers capable of the low amperage the fans draw. So far so good, even held up to the recent snow. I also have a car in the trailer, but that is a more expensive proposition.
The dedicated enclosed trailer for a trailer queen is a good option though. You can keep everything in the trailer and go when ever you need to, that has been the plan of mine for years. But I don't get the jeep out enough anymore to finish that concept. Once work stops getting in the way of my personal life, jeeps will roll again.
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