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Not exactly the same. 20 amp receptacles use screws to terminate the wire end where 15 amp receptacles use friction (push-in) termination.
You are absolutely correct. I guess I should have been more clear.
Of course sub par installation of any device can cause problems.
Those devices are what I was referring to in the quote.

"Speed wire", "Quick wire", or whatever they want to call the devices should be outlawed, especially when people "daisy chain" through the device. (Which is also in violation of the code, but is seen too often.)

I have installed 15a and 20a duplex receptacles in all kinds of installations, from multi-family dwellings (apartment complexes) to installations at the Kennedy Space Center, and NEVER used the push-in terminations.

Sorry if it sounds like I'm attacking anyone, I'm not.
What I was trying to say is 15a receps are approved for 20a circuits, and sounded like an easy upgrade in your situation.

I personally would not use any device that is not terminated with a screw connection for anything more than a desk lamp. :serious:
The use of speedwire terminations is one of the big reasons arc-fault detection devices are now required in residential dwelling units.

One more thing to note.
The 15a rated devices that I have seen with the speedwire feature were not approved for use with 12 awg conductors. Hence the reason I assumed yours were screw terminal connected and would be an easy upgrade.

I tend to forget what Ass U Me means sometimes.:frown2:
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Not exactly the same. 20 amp receptacles use screws to terminate the wire end where 15 amp receptacles use friction (push-in) termination.
I've never seen only the push-in but I have seen a combination. I don't use the push in holes no matter what I get or for whatever purpose.
I curve the wire enough to get it started and then use needle nose to "crimp" a tight closed loop around the screw. Then I tighten the hell out of it with a flat blade, seems to get a better grip with that than the Philips sometimes for me.

I had a neighbor in SA that had outlets without power. Power at circuit breaker, power at some outlets on the circuit. I said just gotta pull plates until we find where it stops. Turned out to be one of those push-in wires popped out.
 

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I really like how stout the framing is. I used 4x4' for the corner supports on my bench. You must be a tall guy with it being 42" height. I am a short person and actually had to dismantle and lower my bench to 30 inches otherwise I needed a step stool to use my vise.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
I really like how stout the framing is. I used 4x4' for the corner supports on my bench.....
Thanks.

......You must be a tall guy with it being 42" height. I am a short person and actually had to dismantle and lower my bench to 30 inches otherwise I needed a step stool to use my vise.
Just 5'11'. It depends on how you use the bench. Mine is for general purpose work so I like my work close to me and my arms at a comfortable level without bending over. I called the owner of my previous house in San Antonio and asked him how high my bench was there... it is 41" and I liked that. I also found this and it made perfect sense (my cuff is 36").
 

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I think the standard cabinet height in a kitchen is 36" and that's about the height of my workbenches. I have an electronics workbench in the house that's probably ~48" and that's a great height to stand and work or sit on a tall chair - I switch off between standing/sitting.
 
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