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First video nice welds and I should have had the audio on but I have too point out that all the comments about pushing or pulling that I read are wrong. Majority of welders and instructors get it backwards due to the fact one book published and used by colleges all over north america had the pictures and sub text reversed.

Pulling the puddle (back hand) gives a rounded profile to fillet welds and slightly increases penetration. The arc is aimed at the puddle and base metal maintaining the puddle temperature for a fraction of a second longer
Pushing the puddle (forehand) gives you a flatter profile and slightly less penetration. The arc is on the skinny part of the puddle and the bulk of the puddle is cooling faster (slightly) and you get less sag (rounded profile)
Perpendicular torch angle gives you a profile between the two above and average penetration.

Ideally you should have the arc near the leading edge of the puddle in order to get any penetration either pushing or pulling. Allowing the arc to stray to the back of the puddle can actually result in a weld with no fusion to the base metal what so ever. This is commonly seen as cold casting in MIG or a pretty weld that is attached to nothing.

The gas you choose will also have an effect on penetration and weld profile. A normal or average gas selection for MIG welding globular and short circuit transfer is C25 sold under several different names with a wide variety of prices.

examples of weld profiles with different shielding gases:




The profiles are exaggerated some for clarity and if you are bored you can section welds, polish smooth up to 800 grit and acid wash the area to get a good idea of what is going on. Common acid mix is 5% hydrochloric acid and 95% isopropal alcohol. Other acids will work and highlight different areas of the weld more than others.

If I get a chance during all the weld testing I have to do this month I will try and get some macro pictures of weld sections.


john
 

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I have some.

And if your old like me, get a set of cheater lenses for your helmet, it makes seeing the puddle flow, arc, and seam much easier, ...

:D
 

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I hate the first video. He is teaching technique to get a good appearance weld. That is the single biggest problem I have when trying to help folks improve their welding and it is the same thing over and over.

Which circles, curlicues, little e's, c's, etc. do I use?

None, learn to hold the gun at 45 45, back hand it and build your weld by staying just at the front edge of the puddle or slightly less and use that until you get your speed and bead width figured out.
 

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I hate the first video. He is teaching technique to get a good appearance weld. That is the single biggest problem I have when trying to help folks improve their welding and it is the same thing over and over.

Which circles, curlicues, little e's, c's, etc. do I use?

None, learn to hold the gun at 45 45, back hand it and build your weld by staying just at the front edge of the puddle or slightly less and use that until you get your speed and bead width figured out.

With stick welding I was taught to do the 45 and then hold until you get your bead size, then you pulled the puddle to start the weld & then pushed back a bit to get penetration & fill your bead again. So it was a sort of pull/push rhythm...this was using 6011 rod.
Your right you want good penetration and a solid weld rather than just a pretty one.
A stress test & a cut sample on a piece should tell you if your weld technique is getting the job done. (What we had done to ours in class.)

With the new MIG wire welder I am having to learn all over again, it didn't seem to work the same as my old stick. (Plus I am old & my eyes are going, I need to get a set of cheaters for my helmet) LoL
 

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Hey all. So I haven't welded in over 12 years and so don't remember much but am looking at getting a mig welder to start doing some fab work. I am firstly looking at installing the Nth shock relocation brackets.

So for someone getting back into it does anyone have any recommendations on mig welders? I am not looking for top of the line but also bottom of the bin ain't gonna cut it either. If anyone has any references they can share I am all ears. Thanks!
 

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I think the best bang (or arc) for your buck is the Hobart Handler 140. It will run off 120V and weld up to 1/4" which is good for Jeep stuff. If you have 220V available, then check out the Handler 210MVP - it will run off 120/240V and weld 3/8" in in a single pass, a big step up in capability.

Then there's the Chinese models - Everlast & Longevity (and others). They have really attractive prices and some have had good luck with them, but if they need service, you have to send it off to the west coast for repair.

I have a Hobart Ironman230 - a great performer and will weld up to 1/2" in a single pass but it's physically large and a tad expensive compared to the Handler models.

If you can consider a stick welder, the ESAB MiniArc 161LTS is the easiest stick welder I have ever used and it's a tiny package and will run on 120/220V. It has hot start and is really, really easy to start an arc. You can get an electrode (welding rod) into places you can't touch with a MIG gun. I can operate it with my 3500 watt generator and use it around the ranch to repair gates, etc.
 

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I have the Hobart 140. This was my first welder and has been a pleasure to learn with. I haven't bought a tank for gas yet, so my work has been done with flux core. I haven't trusted my self to weld control arm brackets to an axle, but I have had no problem with the lower shock brackets I did.

I opted to do the Clayton Shock Relocation brackets. A fraction of the cost of the Nth and does almost the same thing.
 

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I would recommend a 240v welder for the greater capacity - you will want the higher capacity and trying to get by on the 110v box wont last long. I went the road of incrementalism, buying a miller 135_110v machine and upgrading to a miller 211.
The miller machines are very nice. Ive had no problems.

Note. 110v boxes are more particular about their supply power. A dedicated 20 amp circuit with appropriate gauge wire from circuit breaker is a must. You cant just plug them into any 110v outlet and expect them to perform. Extension cords are difficult. I used my 110box on a 10ga extension plugged into laundry recepticals (a dedicated outlet in most homes).
 

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Hobart 175. It's a 220/30 amp. I have had it for many years and it has done everything I have asked of it.
One of my last jobs was cutting off those nth degree stock brackets and fabbing my own. The Nths hung way too far down below the axles for my tastes.
 

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Hobart, Lincoln, Miller. 220v unit if at all possible. Watch Craigslist for good used units. I bought a nice used Miller 220v with lots of extras (tank, stand, helmet, gloves, clamps, etc.) included several years ago for less than a new 120v unit - way less by the time the extras were figured in.
 

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So I bought an ESAB EM215IC welder on Friday and it should arrive this week I hope. It is Mig only, but should work for what I will be doing. I have my grandfather's old miller arc welder that I used last year a few times. I will be doing a lot of practicing with it before doing any projects on my Jeep. I will be doing a triangulation long arm kit sometime late next year. I may even try to find a welding class in the portland oregon area to help.

I got a good deal that I could not pass up.

I will let you know how it goes with practicing.

Chris
 

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Great choice - ESAB makes good stuff. Buy a high quality auto darkening helmet, the 3M Speedglas is a really, really good helmet. Also, there's a ton of very good how-to welding videos on utube. Weldingweb is a good forum for talking metalworking, welding and associated stuff.
 
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