Rubicon Owners Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I replaced my battery in our 2016 JKUR I carefully cleaned the terminal and clamp. I put the felt washers under the clamps, all was well with the new battery. But the cable end clamps did not seem to tighten up really well and on a trip to the desert the engine began cutting out and the gauges were acting kind of wild. I retightened the clamps and again all was well. Recently, going down the highway I noticed the speedometer needle occasionally flickering up and down. Sure enough, I found that I could move the positive cable clamp, I took it off and cleaned it and retightened it, again all seemed well. Yesterday on a Jeep trip to the desert another Jeeper related how a friend had been having trouble with his JK, cutting out, gauges going crazy etc. The dealer replace the computer, but he still had intermittent problems. He ended up selling the Jeep to another friend and after looking over the situation, they solved the problem by installing these.
https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NW_...hTYdb0xGVF8bgWyKdNrk-1637627280-0-gaNycGzNCL0

They are available at NAPA, Amazon, Autozone etc. Pretty cheap fix and since then, no further problems. The cable clamps on the Jeep feature a tapered washer that supposedly tightens up the clamp sufficiently, but battery manufacturers seem to be a bit chintzy on the battery pole diameters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Thanks katsway, that battery post shim is just what I need and will order a couple.

Last spring my wife and I were doing a solo pre-run in the Bodie Hills in the eastern Sierra north of Mono Lake. We stopped at an old mine ruin and returning to the Jeep it would not start and the gages on the dash were acting crazy. We hadn't seen another on the trails all day and were many miles from help. Wife was concerned and I was "on the spot;)"

Looking for a problem found that the battery terminals were loose and would not tighten properly. I added some safety wire under the clamps and the Jeep started and all was normal. At home I replaced the safety wire with some old lead solder I inherited from my dad's shop. But that was a hack fix and now can fix it right with the post shims you have suggested:)

Taking a break, Goldfield NV
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
I’ve used those. I caused an electrolysis issue with a different metal accessory connector. The shims worked great until my battery timed out. Everything is arranged to play nicely now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
I think it will work great. You can find them at auto parts stores too, in the battery section. They are soft lead, so there’s no electrolysis issue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mouse

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That is what I ordered from Amazon as well, I put up the link to NAPA because that was where I found them first. Hopefully they are USA made.
 
  • Like
Reactions: johncanfield

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,359 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dang, just checked Amazon, they are Made in China.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
Thanks for the tech - my wife's 2017 JKU will need a battery soon - I'll order some of these to be ready
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Just got the battery post shims and yes the Schumacher's are made in China. There is no information on the package as to their composition. For their size they are heavy like lead. I'm going to put them on and have a question.

Should I use SILICONE DIELECTRIC GREASE inside and out?

The reason I am asking is I have looked up using dielectric grease and have read completely different opinions on how to use and what it does. I'm hoping the grease will prevent corrosion and keep the connection in good condition.

Exploring a Gold Mine overlooking Goldfield NV
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
I have always used silicone dialectric grease as an insulator - it prevents current flow. It is good at keeping moisture/water out of things, so I only apply it on the outside, not where connections are made.
 
  • Like
Reactions: johncanfield

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Well here I go not leaving well enough alone! Most descriptions of how to use dielectric grease seem to be opinions. No where have I seen definitive tests or experiments on effects and use. But I hate the corrosion I have gotten in the past on my battery connections. I have learned to prevent that by applying dielectric grease by thinly coated the entire battery terminal, clamps inside and out, and any exposed cable. Now I will do the same with the caps and guess that be for better or worse.

One forum discussion comment from an electrician makes sense to me,

"Used dielectric silicon grease on electrical connectors for corrosion prevention. Especially dissimilar metals. I’ve used it in one form or another for 30+ years in the electrical trade. Yes, when thick enough it is an insulator, but when in a compressed connection it doesn’t have any measurable effect. Just works really well to prevent corrosion."
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
Take this for what it’s worth, but I’ve had three vehicles that were prone to battery corrosion. My other three never had an issue. The corrosion three all had some type of sensor piggybacked with the main power lead. The other three did not.
BUT….
They also had chronic ”green wire” in spots. One of these was my 207K F150. I nursed those wires for 8 years and then finally factory replaced the whole positive cable. I had tried dielectric grease to mitigate the corrosion on my F150 and maybe it slowed it, but it remained a chronic condition.

It seems that varying opinions may be out there because of the many factors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Had a problem installing the battery post caps listed above from Amazon. BTW only changing out the positive side.

The problem: The cap is too large for the battery post, too large for the Jeep battery clamp, and forced in, the Jeep JKU 2014 clamp does not have the ability to compress it. After forced installation with the clamp tightened to the max I could lift the connection up off the battery post!

I cut the cap in two pieces and remove about 1/6 inch and tried again, still too big. Final got the connection tight by using 1/2 a cap.

A better cap would be thinner gage and designed to mold around the post, at least for the stock Jeep clamps to work. I assume these caps are designed for a replacement clamp from the parts store.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,505 Posts
My primary uses for silicon dielectric grease are to lube O rings (safer than any petroleum product) and for my coax cable (radio) connections. I stick a gob of the grease in the female fitting and then insert the male connector (and screw down the shell). The center connector is a friction fit so it pushes the grease aside to make a good electrical connection.

It does a great job of keeping the connector guts in a pristine condition. I also use silicon tape on the outside of the connectors followed up with electrical tape.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top