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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went out to start the Jeep and no power, no dash lights, electric steps would not retract, turning the key did nothing... completely dead and no electrical power at all. Opened the hood and could hear clicking in or under the fuse box.

Retreated to my computer to google the problem and found plenty of similar events among JK owners. Now armed with some knowledge checked the voltage of the battery with a meter and 4.6 volts although the battery is only a few months old! Disconnected the battery and hooked up the smart charger and it showed green... a good charge and the meter confirmed 13.2 volts. But why would the battery show 4.6v and then disconnected from the Jeep it jumps to 13.2v?

I hooked the battery back up and the clicking didn't return. Opened the door and the steps retracted, turned the key and the Jeep started right up with everything on the dash looking normal.

Weird... :oops:

Makes me wonder if it's safe to be out in the boondocks with this Jeep
Moab White Wash Sand Dunes EJS 2021
 

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Sounds like you had dirty battery clamps. You probably had the tester on the clamps. Clean your terminals and monitor it.

On another note you do not see JK's with no starts unless the battery is old and dead. If you google it you will see a bunch of JL's with starting issues. A lot of people don't know what model they are driving so you will have to sort through the mess. Jl's have 2 batteries for the Stop/Start which have been known to cause problems.
 

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My wife's one month old Lincoln Aviator (a year ago) acted dead one time, I measured only 7 or 8 volts at the battery which seemed really bizarre. After some research I found that this wasn't uncommon and the 'fix' was to disconnect the negative lead on the battery for a minute or two which will reset the controllers. Sure enough, that was the 'fix.' Still scratching my head on that one but it's only happened one time so far.
 

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My wife's one month old Lincoln Aviator (a year ago) acted dead one time, I measured only 7 or 8 volts at the battery which seemed really bizarre. After some research I found that this wasn't uncommon and the 'fix' was to disconnect the negative lead on the battery for a minute or two which will reset the controllers. Sure enough, that was the 'fix.' Still scratching my head on that one but it's only happened one time so far.
All the garbage electronics and programming they are throwing out there not thoroughly tested. Like the Boeing 737.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My wife's one month old Lincoln Aviator (a year ago) acted dead one time, I measured only 7 or 8 volts at the battery which seemed really bizarre. After some research I found that this wasn't uncommon and the 'fix' was to disconnect the negative lead on the battery for a minute or two which will reset the controllers. Sure enough, that was the 'fix.' Still scratching my head on that one but it's only happened one time so far.
Reading around the Jeep forums this strange shut down of the electronics is actuated by the Jeeps electronic theft control. I did see a red circle light on the right of my dash just before the total shutdown. That I have read is an indication that the theft control has been triggered and it disables the electronics. The clicking under or in the fuse box is suppose to be one of the indicators which I had. The fix is to take off the battery ground and then reconnect. Actually I don't have any knowledge about this but the battery disconnect did fix it and just reporting what others have said on Jeep forums. Guess it is just another black box mystery complements of modern technology.

Baby Steps Trail, Klondike Bluffs, North of Moab UT - Not much of a step but we are new to wheeling together and practicing some spotting so we have it down for the big stuff;)
 

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................Baby Steps Trail, Klondike Bluffs, North of Moab UT - Not much of a step but we are new to wheeling together and practicing some spotting so we have it down for the big stuff;)
Exactly the way to build up your wheeling skills and discover limitations with your Jeep in offroad situations. Try to wheel with others that are experienced and watch what they do, I learned quite a bit that way.

When you encounter an obstacle, get out and look it over. On that ledge you were getting spotted over, I would have gone straight down instead of going off-camber on the side but I have quite a bit of ground clearance. It might have been necessary for you to go to the side, I don't know your tire size, skid plate situation, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Exactly the way to build up your wheeling skills and discover limitations with your Jeep in offroad situations. Try to wheel with others that are experienced and watch what they do, I learned quite a bit that way.

When you encounter an obstacle, get out and look it over. On that ledge you were getting spotted over, I would have gone straight down instead of going off-camber on the side but I have quite a bit of ground clearance. It might have been necessary for you to go to the side, I don't know your tire size, skid plate situation, etc.
I would have gone straight down but the big rock in front of the Jeep was loose and might have rolled. Took the off camber around as I saw it would be OK. Going over the other side, driver in the pic, to avoid the loose rock would have put my passenger front into the low point below the step and might have been a more off-camber move. Again the big rock was loose and if I split the difference it could have rolled out and even made like a pole vault into the underside. Maybe:oops:

Tires 35's, 3.5 inch lift with AEV skids.
 
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