Rubicon Owners Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Sarcastic Moderator
Joined
·
14,064 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
looking for a decent welder to do some fab work, and came across a new Hobart handles 140 for $449. Wondering if it is powerful enough. I was planning to get the spool runner 100 to also weld aluminum. Looking for something to weld 1/4" steel, Stainless and aluminum. Was also looking at the Hobart 210 buy it is $820 versus $450.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
looking for a decent welder to do some fab work, and came across a new Hobart handles 140 for $449. Wondering if it is powerful enough. I was planning to get the spool runner 100 to also weld aluminum. Looking for something to weld 1/4" steel, Stainless and aluminum. Was also looking at the Hobart 210 buy it is $820 versus $450.
Elwarpo,
Well, I could go crazy here explaining many of the differences in welders.
But, suffice to say that, the lighter duty the welder, less capable it will be of producing quality welds in any form of substantial steel or, aluminum for that matter. You mentioned 1/4" steel. Well, unless 120V welders have changed capabilities in the last decade, 1/4" steel is phenomenally stretching that kind of welders limits. Yes, a weld can be produced on and with one of those but, can you DEPEND ON IT? Would you trust your life with it? I wouldn't, that's for sure.

Along with being a 35 year fireman, I've also been welding for close to 50 years. While having 120V welder has some benefits, (limited) and, yes they are by far, cheaper, the limitations to me, far outweigh the cost. I've owed and welded with many welders over the years and, well, it's just worth it for me, to spend more, to get WAY MORE.

1. If you purchase a low voltage, light duty welder, that's basically all you'll be able weld, with any confidence.
2. If you spend more, and purchase even a cheaper, 220V unit, you'll be able to weld, even as much as 1/2", if ever needed. But, the 1/4" that you mentioned, will be child's play for a 220V unit.
3. A 220V unit will do as stated, 1/2" all the way down to 16 ga. or, around 1/16" material. But, you cannot say that for a 120V unit.

It's kind of like building a Jeep. Many ask what to do, to a stock Jeep, to have good fun. But, they say they don't want to do EXTREME stuff, like many of us do. My advice is always the same. If you build it for very limited off road activity, that's what you'll ALWAYS BE LIMITED TO.

If you go for a trail ride with your buddies and, they turn to a more difficult trail, and you KNOW THAT YOU CANNOT PARTICIPATE due to the lack of capability of your Jeep, you'll be wishing you'd have built it to handle higher challenging trails/obstacles.

Well, welding is the same scenario. Sorry for the long winded explanation but, I just wanted you to see where I'm coming from. Good luck.
Scott
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,078 Posts
I have the Hobart 140 and have found it to be extremely easy to use, even as an extreme welding noob. I've used it to replace the floor in my MJ, weld nuts to broken bolts, build seat brackets, assemble some shelf brackets for my wife, tacked together a bumper and tacked axle brackets in place. The machine is rated to 1/4" with two passes, but I have a hard time trusting the integrity of that kind of weld. Notice for the real thick stuff I only used the Hobart 140 to tack parts together, then took them over to a buddy's shop with an ancient 240v Miller. The 240v machine simply has more capacity to produce a good weld in the thick stuff, especially for a greenhorn like myself.

I did use the Hobart 140 to attach shock brackets to an 8.8 under my MJ. They have taken a few rock hits and haven't budged. I did this as an experiment to see how stout my welds are with the Hobart 140.

I've only been using it with flux core wire as I haven't invested in a gas tank yet. My welding buddy tells me my welds will greatly improve with gas.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,068 Posts
I would bump to the 210MVP

I used the similar lincoln welder for a few years. It did fine, but the 220V option with the MVP has made things wedding much easier and better. Well worth the extra $$$

Its also duty cycle, the MVP has a better one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
771 Posts
I just moved from the miller 135 to the miller 211. Similar to the Hobart 140/210 for comparison. If I was smart I would have purchased the bigger machine first, you are likely to want to do more then the saller machine can handle with a hobby welder at the controls.
The 120 v M135 is great if you want to do body and exhaust work, I did a ton of work on .120 tubing for railings (decks handicapped rails). I would not use it for anything larger and the 120 was finicky if the line voltage wasn't excellent. If yu want to do 1/4 then you have to have excellent welding skills/technique with 120v machines for multiple passes with proper prep and technique. I had some problems with running cold beads over .120 thickness. You must run the 120 machines on a decent 20 amp circuit with a large(10Ga) extension cord if used.

I would get the larger machine it will give you more range- better resale also.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
Buy bigger, avoid the limitations of the smaller welder. IMHO. Albeit, the Hobart 140 is a good unit, used within it's limitations. I bought a Miller 220v welder used via Craigslist for about what I would have paid for a new 120v unit. Miller, Lincoln, or Hobart are decent welders.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,182 Posts
I have been running the Hobart 175 Handler for sev4ral years. You have seen the results on my threads and post. Not the absolute best in the industry but has done everything I have asked of it from MIG. Would I trade it--hell no. Do I want a TIG? Hell yes.

In short ,I trust Hobart
 

·
Sarcastic Moderator
Joined
·
14,064 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys, looks like the 210 then. Tractor supply is having nice sales on them. I was leaning to the 210 because of the spoolrunner 100 gun is capable with it. I am a newbie welder but want to work up to bigger projects. I figure it with the plasma cutter makes for fun future projects.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,182 Posts
Thanks guys, looks like the 210 then. Tractor supply is having nice sales on them. I was leaning to the 210 because of the spoolrunner 100 gun is capable with it. I am a newbie welder but want to work up to bigger projects. I figure it with the plasma cutter makes for fun future projects.
If ya get a deal,on two,p-cutters send me one---Santa! Pr Etta please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
Good choice on going with the 210. It has been extremely frustrating to have a welder, and not being able to weld stuff around my familys farm. While I do trust my 140 on 1/4'' stuff, I would not put my life on it. The 140 on the other hand, for what it is capable of doing, IMHO, is probably one of the best bang for the buck welders you can get, the problem is, once you know what you are doing, you get up against it's ceiling very quickly. I paid $275 for mine, with a cart, used off craigslist, so it was a no brainer for me.
I used to build tractor cabs and various other parts, had very big welders, it is amazing the difference when a welder laughs at 1/2" stuff.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,919 Posts
Great advice from everybody! I'll add that Hobart and Miller are owned by the same holding company and share many parts among the various models. In come cases the machines are almost identical. Hobart makes some very, very good machines.

Go as large as you can afford. I have a Hobart Ironman 230 and it has been an excellent performer - I can weld 1/2" steel in a single pass.
 

·
Sarcastic Moderator
Joined
·
14,064 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
well I ordered the Hobart 210 today, now to learn to weld properly.

Conversation I once heard between an old timer and young guy in maintenance when I asked about welding.

Young guy "your welds don't have to look good, just be strong, that's why they made grinders."

Old timer "Son, then you are a grinder and not a welder"
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,919 Posts
You will be really happy with the 210 Mike - great choice! Congrats!

I took an adult ed welding/cutting class a few years ago and each student had limited steel to work with - I wound up doing so much grinding of bad stick welds I told the instructor this class should have been called Grinding and Cutting.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top