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I want to be able to put 35's under Rubi, but I don't want to raise the center of gravity at all. I'm not a smart man but raising a Jeep just to raise it doesn't seem wise. Anyone have any suggestions on how to stuff 35's in her and still keep it generally low while still allowing max travel? Probably a dumb question, but I am a true rookie.
 

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not a dumb question.....

i feel more secure in this Rubi with a Long Arm lift then the
other 2 jeeps ive owned. they were all over the road at 4'' + of lift.

its all about getting it done right. driving skill is also a factor.
join a club or find some local Jeep`rs
have fun stay safe.

check with Jerry C. hes got a kick buttt Air Rubi :moon:
:wink:
 

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you can have a lot of downward travel, but there is no real way around upward travel without a lift unless you want to start hacking away at your jeep with a sawzall. but then again, to get insane downward travel without a lift, you still have to use a hole saw and get coilovers. :D
 

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Esentially the answer is no, but you can do it with minimal lift and low center of gravity.
One problem is that having next to no upward travel actually makes you less stable when flexing. Maybe sounds strange, but think of driving over a big rock. If your suspension has enough upward travel the tire tucks up and the body tips very little so all tires maintain traction. If you don't have much upward travel then the body will tip away from the rock until the oposite rear corner is also stuffed, then the Jeep gets lifted up and teeters on those two tires. Even if you have enough droop to get the other tires on the ground there is minimal weight on them and little traction. Also as you come over the rock the Jeep will tip way backwards going up and then tip forwards coming down. Not nearly as stable as the first scenario and less warning when you get to a potential tip-over situation.

On side hills you will be more stable being lower, but it is more a function of how well your suspension resists unloading. This is one of the few situations where sway bars are your friend. I've also seen guys with limiting straps that can be shortened to prevent unloading of the uphill side.

Ideally you would have as much upward travel as downward travel and you would get your stability by making your rig wider.
In the real world of compromises if I wanted low COG and 35s I would do a 3" suspension lift, shocks from a 4.5" lift with the rears angled, and 2" body lift. Then use wheels with 3" backspacing and put on wider fender flares.
 

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Ahh yes....im not sure if this was mentioned but I can always be the devils advocate....CUT THE FENDERS AND REAR WHEEL WELLS OFF!!!LOL....I bet a sawzel could help them fit. I have read that this is what a lot of those real big rigs we see on 4x4 TV do in order to prevent from having to put huge amounts of lift in order to clear 44 in tires....etc...anyhow..its a little extreme but might work...
Pete M
 

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I have seen a Rubicon with flat fenders.....Lots of wheel travel if you have the guts to take a sawzall to a new vehicle!
 
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