Rubicon Owners Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
972 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone care to share any innovations in draining oil when an aftermarket skid plate is involved?

I always get residual oil in the skid plate which tends to dribble oil on the drive. So far I have pressure washed the upper portion of the plate, but that is getting old.

I have seen pumps that draw oil out through the dipstick, and valves that replace the plug in the pan that might allow a tube to direct the flow into the collector. Anyone tried such approaches?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,769 Posts
I always pull my skid plate so I can clean it and I won't put a hole in it for draining the oil, but that's just me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,418 Posts
My Warn skid came with a hole for changing oil but I no longer do my own oil because my mechanic can do it almost as cheaply and I'm not as limber as I used to be. He also reaches in from the side and wipes the skid off. The only concern I would have with one of those lever shut off valves is catching a branch just right (wrong) and opening it. A long time ago I kicked up a small branch with my CJ5 and it went right into the flywheel inspection hole. Scared the hell out of me!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
972 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
My UCF skid does have a hole, and I am a little wary of those valves. I guess that is why I asked. The one Jeff linked to appears pretty solid.

I had a hose permanently attached to the diesel on my sailboat, but there was little risk to it being jarred loose.

I will take another look at the space available to access the lever once installed. The hose would only be put in place during the oil change to guide the flow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
My UCF skid does have a hole, and I am a little wary of those valves. I guess that is why I asked. The one Jeff linked to appears pretty solid.

I had a hose permanently attached to the diesel on my sailboat, but there was little risk to it being jarred loose.

I will take another look at the space available to access the lever once installed. The hose would only be put in place during the oil change to guide the flow.
I don't have any experience with them but I was going to send you this link:
https://ezoildrainvalve.com/index.html

Appears it's the same one Jeff linked.
It did have this little helpful note. Again, not sure if you have the space to access the clip.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
As to the valve being opened on the trail accidentally. The pictures shown in the link FLLJ provided has threads for a hose. If there is a bolt to plug the end of the hose then it's safe.

I have some experience with this, I have installed a hose onto the oil drain on my KTM motorcycle. It has a bolt to plug the end and It's safe under the skid plate. If I had a valve it would essentially be open all the time.

So this is a good idea and I'll put this on my to-do list but the valve will have a hose with a bolt in the end to be sure.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
3,369 Posts
The Fumoto brand drain valve has been around for as long as I can remember, and comes with a clip to prevent accidental oil drains.

But what is keeping a person from putting a screw in nipple into the oil pan, attaching a rubber hose with a brass end cap. Doesn't have to be long, and everything is likely common plumbing supplies for the exception of the oil pan part. That is how all the oil is drained from my zero turn mowers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I have the UCF skid and use this onehttps://www.amazon.com/Fumoto-F-111N-Engine-Drain-Valve/dp/B003VCBDG4
I put a hose on the end and drain directly into the 5 quart jugs. At first I was worried about the small amount of oil left in the pan, so for good measure I'd pour in about 1/4 of a quart before closing the valve to "flush out" the old.

Yeah it's slower to drain, but the zero mess makes it worth the wait.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Years ago we had a John Deere 7020 and to drain the oil you had to crawl under the tractor and reach waaaay up there to unscrew the drain plug, guaranteeing that you would get hot oil splashed down on you. I took the drain plug, which had an o-ring seal on it, and drilled out the center, tapped it with NPT pipe threads and attached a hose routed out to the side with a cap or plug on it...don't remember which. It worked well. You could do the same with a Jeep, therefore keeping the standard drain plug and whatever threads it has.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
A good quality hydraulic hose would resist abrasion, they are pretty strong since they are wire braid reinforced.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top