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WaterWetter® is a unique wetting agent for cooling systems which reduces coolant temperatures by as much as 30ºF. This liquid product can be used to provide rust and corrosion protection in plain water for racing engines, which provides much better heat transfer properties than glycol-based antifreeze. Or it can be added to new or used antifreeze to improve the heat transfer of ethylene and propylene glycol systems. Designed for modern aluminum, cast iron, copper, brass and bronze systems. Compatible with all antifreezes, including the latest long-life variations.

I have run this stuff for many years and it works.I have used it in my bikes,race cars and daily drivers.I never did get a 30F drop but usually a 10f-20f drop.Its the first mod I`ll be doin when my freeking Ruby comes in.


Bill
 

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I thought about using that but couldn't find out if it was compatible with the 5 year/100,000 mile HOAT (Hybrid Organic Additive Technology) coolant that's in our Jeeps. Also from the owners manual "Do not use additional rust inhibitors or antirust products, as they may not be compatible with the radiator coolant and may plug the radiator". I'd be interested if anyone has any info as to the compatibility.

An interesting side note from the FSM: All Jeep models have a leak detection additive added to the cooling system before they leave the factory. The additive is highly visible under ultraviolet light (black light)... snip ...The black light will cause the additive to glow a bright green color.

Brad
 

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Back in my Honduh days all the guys that had overheating problems with the older cars would run this stuff. But they would have to replace their rads pretty quick after as this stuff just eats right through them...

However their temps were much better and their rads weren't in super shape to begin with.

I AM talking about 10-15 year old cars here. So perhaps camperguy's experience is more relevant here...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Eats their radiators? I ran the stuff in my last truck for 75,000 miles with no problems :D

Bill
 
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I use that stuff in my computer, it does work. Just don't tell any dealers you use that stuff. Water wetter, or Purple Ice at your average dealer will result in a loss of warranty. If you have a concern about loosing your warranty ask a dealer, and if they say it's ok, GET IT IN WRITING.
 

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Because the engines computer needs to see a certain temp to run in closed loop.The engine runs in rich mod below a certain temp and will kill gas mileage :roll: and could cause the cats to plug up .


Bill
 
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if i'm not mistaken it's 160 degrees.

Edit: Due to another thread i'd also like to add that warranty loss on this one is a for sure thing. The manual clearly states that additives are not to be used in your car. Just wanted to make that clear before you guys start hurling your insults my way in this thread too.
 

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The water wetter does a great job and I have been using it for five years with good results. Here are some tips that will help you get the most for cooling and wheeling in extra hot weather.

Use a higher water concentration in the coolant. Coolant actually is a insulator and does not help in cooling. It does raise the boiling temp but a higher water ratio of 20% coolant will protect against boil-over.

Check your pressure cap. If your pressure cap is not sealing correctly or not maintaining enough pressure your coolant will boil-over much sooner due to the low pressure.

Check your fan. Clutch fans do wear out on occasion and make sure the fan is not bound up and being slowed down by a fan shroud or debris in the fan shroud.

Keep the grill and radiator clean and clear. Installing a tall winch will slow down the air flow and make the cooling less efficient. Also clean out the mud, dirt and other things that will slow down the air flow.

Before running out to get a 180 or even 160 thermostat keep in mind a thermostat will often time never help in cooling. If your motor is running hot a cooler thermostat will only delay the motor from over-heating. A cooler thermostat is not a good idea if you drive in an area that gets extremely cold because the motor will not be able to warm up and cause you to use more fuel and will trip the check engine light and fail smog checks. Do test your thermostat if you don’t think it is working correctly.

Check your hoses especially the lower radiator hose. Older lower hoses may collapse because it is under suction. If you have ever changed a lower hose you will notice a spring in the lower hose, this is to prevent collapsing of this hose.

For cooling problems an electrical fan is not going to help. An engine driven fan will out perform an electric fan. Adding an additional electric fan in the front will help.

The stock radiator is a toy because of all the plastic involved and I would recommend a quality 3 row copper radiator. The 3 row will hold more coolant and cool more efficiently.

If you are stuck with very high coolant temps you can do the following to keep from blowing your top;
1. Turn off the AC (if you had it on) and turn on the heater full blast.
2. Do keep the motor running but don’t put it under a load. If you can keep the motor running the water will keep on circulating and the fan will keep on turning, you maybe able to cool it back down.
3. Make sure the belt is still on and the fan is still turning. You will be able to confirm this without opening up the hood by placing your hand near the front fenders to feel for the airflow.
4. If you have to open the hood, do so knowing that the pressure cap or a hose may let go scalding you with steam and very hot water. If you can avoid staying away from the radiator and hoses, do so until it cools.
5. Do not open the radiator cap. For some reason people think that removing the cap will cool things down this is not true at all. Keep the cap on,
 

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The 175 thermostat will work but if you are in a very cold climate in teh winter the motor may never hit the target temperature and kick off the check engine light. The computer need the motor to hit a certain temp within a certain time (I think it was 10 minutes after start up). A very lower thermostat will take the motor a much longer time to get warmed up because when the water in the block hits 175 is will be dumped into the radiator and cooler water will be pulled in. By the time this water is pulled in the thermostat will be closed again and the water will have to hit the 175 again and this will happen for quite awhile until all the coolant heats up to operating temperatures and that may never happen in the winter.

I generally don't recommend a 180 or less thermostat in an area that sees icing conditions or snow for that reason unless you are will to swap in a high temp thermostat for the winter.

On the freeway in the winter I will have to place a sheet of plastic in front of the grill to slow down the air so I can keep the engine temps up. My check engine light will come on if I don't but this is due to my 180 thermostat and an aluminum radiator. I don't think most people will have to do this for a 180 thermostat but for extended operations in that enviroment you may have too.
 

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Thanks for the information James. That's exactly what I needed to hear.

I noticed that all winter here in WA I was running at about 165-170, and now that summer is here I'm bouncing between 200-210 constantly. I knew it wasn't anything wrong with my rig, but I was curious if a lower temperature thermostat would correct this. (Not that it's really a problem, as it's designed to work that way)

I guess I won't go with a different thermostat.
 
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