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I had a problem with one of my locker pumps cycling on and off, and after doing the typical troubleshooting I was down to the pump as the culprit.

I thought I'd share my method for repairing the pump in case someone else runs into this.

Rubicon locker pumps can leak internally at the bleed valve. The result is a pump that runs continuously or cycles intermittently similar to a leak somewhere else in the system.

The bleed valve is controlled by a solenoid. When power is applied to the pump, the solenoid closes the bleed valve so it can pressurize the locker. When the locker is deselected and power is removed, the solenoid opens the bleed valve so air pressure can bleed off.

You can test for this problem on the bench or in the vehicle by placing your thumb over the outlet and applying 12 volts to the pump. It should run a short time and stop and should not cycle again until you remove your thumb. If the bleed valve is leaking the pump will cycle at a frequency relative the the severity of the leak.

This problem can be fixed in some cases.

Begin by removing the crimped on metal plate, which is only crimped on 3 of the 4 sides. This is relatively easy to do using a pliers or screwdriver. Be careful not to put deep nicks in the edges of the flange because you want to reinstall this plate later, and only bend the flange back far enough to get the cover off.

Remove the cover and note the gasket located between the plate and the pump housing.

You will note a circuit board with 3 wires soldered to it that are routed from the bottom side. You must de-solder these wires - note which color goes where.

Once the wires are free you can gently pull the assembly from the pump housing by using a gentle and constant pull combined with a little twisting action. There are two ports in the bottom of the assembly that extend into the plastic housing through o-rings and you are trying to coax the assembly to separate at that point - that is the spongy resistance you feel as you pull.

Once the assembly is removed you should inspect the o-rings and housing for dirt and clean as necessary. Then inspect the ports on the bottom of the assembly and clean up any corrosion or dirt. In my case I had some fine sand on the o-rings and internal pump housing, and corrosion on the metal port extensions.

After cleaning everything I used a light silicone grease on the o-rings and ports before re-assembly which helped get things back together without a struggle.

Route the wires to the correct pads on the board and re-solder. Install the gasket and hold the plate in place with your thumb applying pressure while you use a pliers to re-crimp the plate.

Voila! Your leak is fixed and your pump is back up and working.
 

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Good info if I'll need it in the future. Maybe a moderator can move it to tips...techniques and write-ups so it's easier to find later.
 

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03 Rubicon and 19’ JLUR
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107 Posts
Well I found this thread today since I have the same issue and I will try this out and let you know!
 
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