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I know I asked this in a different thread but the subject of the thread didn't really address this and was hopeing for some response.

I have an '04 with 4.5" of lift with 33's, very soon to be 35's.. Just got a 48" High-Lift jack primarily because I know if I got a flat I know my stock jack would be worthless, fortunately I have never had a flat so far. I haven't done a test because I'm not carrying it yet but I'm thinking with the starting height and spring drop the jack still won't even get the tire off the ground.

Will the High-Lift get my tire off the ground? Or, am I gonna still be searching for something stable a couple feet tall to put under it?
Anyone ever thought about wrapping a chain around the diff and frame so the spring doesn't drop when lifting?

Thanks
 

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I have a 48" High Lift and I recently suffered my first trail flat. The high lift lifted the tire off the grown with plenty of room to spare. My Rubicon has a 4" lift and 1.25" BL on 33"s. I am not sure about putting anything under the jack, from my experience the Hi-Lifts are not all that stable even on the ground. I would also recommend getting the off road base for the jack to help out. After using my jack it is on my short list of items to purchase. Another suggestion for your spring droop would be to try to reattach or relock your sway bar if the terrain allows it. I am sure that there are more knowledgeable people on here with more technical descriptions. But I hope the info helps.
 

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Yes, it should get your tire off the ground...and I don't recommend putting anything under the hi-lift. :eek:
 

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We generally use a ratchet strap on the axle to lesson the amount of droop when using a H-Lift. We just attach the strap to the frame.
 

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My 48" HiLift will raise my 37s off the ground when lifting from the sliders, front or rear bumper. I also have about 8" of droop.

That said, if I were going to change out a tire, I also would use a jackstrap to keep the travel to a minimum. Then support the axle with some sort if make shift jack stand. The whole be safe thing.
 

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im on 40's and the stock jack lifts a tire off the ground just fine...

just put it under the axle tube and jack it up.
 

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geroux said:
Will the High-Lift get my tire off the ground? Or, am I gonna still be searching for something stable a couple feet tall to put under it?
Anyone ever thought about wrapping a chain around the diff and frame so the spring doesn't drop when lifting?

Thanks
Sure it'll lift it. But if at all possible use the stock Jeep jack under the axle. Many times on the trail getting the Jeep Jack under there can be next to impossible, that's when a High Lift is a life saver. I have 33" tires on mine and lifting the front when discoed is almost impossible on flat level ground. It sure is awkward and can be dangerous doing it anyway. The tie down strap thing works real good but can be inconvenient to do if you are hub deep in mud.
 

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I have, by far, used my hi-lift more for winching than for jacking, but it's done it's share of lifting jeeps over the years as well as buildings, trailers, trees, and other really heavy stuff.

Like others have said, you have to determine for yourself whether it's going to be easier to use the stock jack, or the hi-lift on a case by case basis.

Heh, on my old YJ, which I never had lockers or a winch, I used to use the stock jack to get unstuck. Let me tell you what, you become a pretty good wheeler after a while of getting stuck, and having to use the stock jack to get you out. Upgrading to the hi-lift, a ten foot piece of chain with chain hooks on each end, some strap, and clevis was a big help. I was then able to hand winch the Jeep out, though it was laborious. A lot of people jump straight to an electric winch these days, which is almost cheating! :cheesy: I blame it on ADD. Can't take the time to learn how it's much more important to not get stuck. :laugh:

I upgraded the handle to a piece of rigid EMT, because it makes a better sleeve for ruined tie rods, and it's not a bad hammer now either. Good for prying as well.
I have used the jack to lift sheds, garages, and other small buildings, in addition to vehicles and trailers.
I knew I had this old page bookmarked somewhere, it's a quick rundown of how to use it for other things:
http://www.4x4now.com/bb0997.htm
Here is another one, a bit more updated:
http://www.offroadadventures.com/articles/view/id/347

In any case, now you know there is a lot of uses for the jack, besides changing tires.
Respect the Jack, it's a tool, and it can screw stuff up as easily as repair. If used incorrectly, or in an unsafe manner, it's easy to get hurt. I have been pinched, punched, whacked and had a Jeep fall off once. I have heard of people getting hit in the face with the jack handle too. Luckily never experienced that one. I pull the handle when I am done jacking the vehicle UP.
 

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Al said:
f9k9 said:
We generally use a ratchet strap on the axle to lesson the amount of droop when using a H-Lift. We just attach the strap to the frame.
X2

X3, this is how the vehicle should be lifted utilizing a hi-lift...........the least amount of height possible. We use the ratchet strap method all the time and barely got to jack it up to get it off the ground. More stable that way as well.
 

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Before you start using a highlift and jacking it to max height, or even 1/2 way, I highly recommend that you use the stock jack or carry a bottle jack. Even though I have a 48" highlift, I will only use it in situations where a bottle jack will not work. Safety first. :)
 

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I mostly carry a hi-lift because the handle is so fricking useful! I absolutely hate having to use the hi-lift for anything though I have used it before.



Here is me replacing a flat with the hi-lift on a hi-lift stand being supported with the winch cable to keep it from going over AND an aligator jack AND the stock bottle jack ... and it was still wobbly though I didn't feel unsafe with the spare tire under the frame in case it fell (the ground was very loose sheet rocks).
 

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Hopefully not loose ones :roll: :cheesy: :D
 

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seapahn said:
I mostly carry a hi-lift because the handle is so fricking useful! I absolutely hate having to use the hi-lift for anything though I have used it before.



Here is me replacing a flat with the hi-lift on a hi-lift stand being supported with the winch cable to keep it from going over AND an aligator jack AND the stock bottle jack ... and it was still wobbly though I didn't feel unsafe with the spare tire under the frame in case it fell (the ground was very loose sheet rocks).

Had a floor jack just like the photo and the spare tire as well under the frame and it still colapsed and crushed me! Life flights are overrated
 

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I totally agree with the instability of a Hi-lift in general but sometimes you are forced to use it. I have used a hi-lift for many a thing even some stupid stuff. Lifted my wheel by the bead ring to stack rocks under a wheel, jacked up the rig under the rocker armor and drove off, bottle opener of course!, as a winch/come along, handle is like a multi tool, used main beam and a mess of hose clamps to splint broken steering linkage to get a rig off a trail, the list of uses is endless but I rarely use it for changing tires or axles and such mostly for safety reasons. Was always taught to never trust one, and to never take your eye off it if your were using one.

For getting a wheel off the ground to change axles, tires, or re-seat beads and such, I carry a few (4) short 4x4 ends around with me. Good to put under the jack or block a wheel or both. Have also stacked rocks as a base for the stock jack. And I carry a bottle jack as well.

As far as a strap or chain to limit droop and maximize the amount the tire is lifted both a tree strap and a clevis around the frame as well as a chain with a removable link have worked successfully.
 

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Stock Jack is much easier and safer.
 

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Zach said:
Stock Jack is much easier and safer.
Agreed but, if you could get a piece similar to what is on the top of the stock jack, welded onto a bottle jack. I think it would be perfect.
 

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Last time I used my hi-lift on the Jeep (only time actually). I couldn't get it to ratchet back down. Because of that, I will only use it as a last resort. And bc of what Murphy said. Lol

*added the underlined part for clarification*
 
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