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I just bought a used 06 Rubicon and was wanting any recommendations members could give on putting together a must have take along tool kit for day trips and such. Total noob. Any help appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Welcome,

I think there are 2 kits you need.

1. Basic tool kit to fix broken stuff.

2. Recovery kit to get you out of being stuck in or on something.

If you describe your intended adventure I'm sure the pros here will have good advice on things you need.
 

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Welcome! Here's some assorted and spontaneous thoughts to expand on Bob's comment.

I might have a more expanded collection of tools, etc. than the average wheeler running easy trails in a group. I do hard trails and lead medium to 'easy' hard trails - as trail leader I'm responsible for getting everybody in my group back safely which sometimes means doing trail repairs.

I carry one of those Chinese wrench and socket sets that has a fold up plastic case - it's extremely handy and easier to use than digging through a bag of wrenches and sockets. You should carry the axle nut socket - I forgot the size in mm, maybe 36mm? 1/2" breaker bar (and a piece of tube for more more leverage), bottle jack with an adapter (like a "Y") to fit under the axle. Two pair of vice grips - you'll need two if you need to clamp off a broken brake line. Large Crescent wrench, large adjustable pliers ('water pump pliers'.) Oh, a 12 point socket for the brake caliper bolts - was that 10mm or 12mm guys?

Thinking.. basic electrical tools, multimeter, 10' or so of 14 gauge wire. Electrical tape. Gorilla tape.

I have a short length of light chain with a long bolt/nut in case something needs to be chained back together.

Also a quart container (or bag) of assorted SAE and metric nuts and bolts from 1/4" to 5/8" in various length. If you do some upgrades, save any hardware you take off or don't use.

Waterless hand cleaner, roll of blue shop paper towels. Something to use as a catch pan - plastic tray, liter soda bottle, etc.

Assorted hose clamps. Cotter pins - various lengths and diameters. Having wheeled with a friend that broke a front brake line, I carry a spare (and needed it in Moab last year!) Two driveshaft U-joints for rear DS.

Fluids - two bottles of brake fluid, three or four of ATF, couple of quarts of oil. I also carry a gallon of pre-mix coolant.

I carry two tire repair kits, one from ARB and one is a truck tire kit because I don't run with a spare tire. Even if you have a spare, some tire damage could be repaired saving a bunch of trail time.

Navigation gear. Most of us in our club use Back Country Navigator running on an Android tablet. There's a good mapping program for iOS but I don't remember what it's called. Carry one of those battery packs in case you need to power or recharge something. I recently ditched jumper cables in favor of those large lithium battery packs that will start the average vehicle (and it does!)

Two small fire extinguishers. I advise you do not buy the cheap dry chemical kind - they will put out a fire but make a humongous mess to clean up afterwards. Here's what I carry in Rubi and my truck. We also have large versions of the foam extinguishers in the RV, house and shop.

A good first aid kit, I carry one from Adventure. They are made specifically for the outdoorsman, hiker, camper, etc.

Wow, this is long enough and I didn't even cover recovery stuff.
 

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With the TJ Rubicon, its an interesting mix of metric and standard bolts and nuts. I make sure I carry two of each small wrench in both metric and standard. I carry large crescent wrenches that fit my johnny joint lock nuts. From harbor freight, I carry a set of what they call "field wrenches". They are stubby thin aluminum wrenches that go from 19mm to 34mm. ive used them numerous times.


I have a bag full of bolts and nuts ive taken of jeeps at the local pick and pull. I make sure I have spare front and rear trackbar bolts and that funny nut on a stick thingy for the front. I carry spare lug nuts and studs, nuts for the front axle stub shaft that goes through the unit bearing, and a whole host of oem stuff that I can find.


The biggest thing is that the kit you build, you need to start servicing your jeep with it. This way you know what works and what can be left at home. I am constantly adding and removing stuff. But I still carry a metric ton of junk. Im the guy in my group that has almost everything




Almost forgot. My jeep I am running hydro assist steering. So I carry caps for these lines in case I cant fix them. I also carry caps and fittings for my brake lines and trans lines. I do carry spares for each of those systems, but the caps don't take up much space and are a good plan B
 

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.....The biggest thing is that the kit you build, you need to start servicing your jeep with it. This way you know what works and what can be left at home. I am constantly adding and removing stuff. But I still carry a metric ton of junk. Im the guy in my group that has almost everything
Exactly! That's the best way to know what tools you need is to do your own service and upgrades. Thank goodness for the guys in a group that carry tools and parts! I've not gone as far as carrying spare drive shafts but I've seen guys with them clamped to cages. I do carry spare axles and drive shafts on the coach though.

Almost forgot. My jeep I am running hydro assist steering. So I carry caps for these lines in case I cant fix them. I also carry caps and fittings for my brake lines and trans lines. I do carry spares for each of those systems, but the caps don't take up much space and are a good plan B
Blaine fixed me up with a hose to connect the two ports on the hydro assist cylinder so I wouldn't squirt fluid all over when steering if I needed to take it out of the system. I need to check spares and make sure I can deal with a steering cylinder breakdown. That's a super idea to carry caps to isolate a brake issue. I changed my tranny cooler lines to all AN fittings and hose from the radiator to the tranny cooler to the transmission - all of the hardline is gone.
 

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Mr. Blaine also schooled me on brake lines. You can buy fittings, I forget what they are called, that adapt your brake lines to AN fittings. the banjos on my front calipers and all other fittings are converted this way. Now, when I have a brake line failure, replacement is literally a minute, with bleeding. Also, I don't have to carry all of the rigid hard line anymore that the OEM lines are composed of.
 

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And: bailing wire, duct tape, couple small ratchet straps.
Didn't we have a thread at one point on this subject?

Bob, you're correct, there is, but.............

Probably do somewhere but this kept me busy and out of trouble :wink2:.

.....John has conquered the old "idle hands" axiom.
 

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If you have Johnny Joints, a large ratchet strap is also useful if you have to take a control arm off for repair. The best way ive found to get the link to line back up with its bracket has been to use a heavy ratchet strap around the axle and attatched to one of the frame holes to pull it back into place.
 

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I'm late to the party, as usual.

One thing I didn't see listed is a tarp. I hate working under a Jeep while laying in mud, sand, saw grass, fire ants, rocks, briars, etc.

Then, once back in the Jeep and rolling again, I'm not slimy, gritty, cut, bitten,bruised, or perforated.
 
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