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I want to run a stupid idea past those that have done more welding than I. I have a fuel storage caddy I use for my business and it holds 30 gallons of gasoline. It is cheap, super cheap, the pump that was on it was even more cheap..... At the time I didn't care, I just needed a way to hold a good amount of non-ethanol fuel for short periods of time. See pic, what I have is very similar.

I now need to replace the pump on it, and I have purchased a decent GPI pump and made it to fit on this tank. However the fit to the tank could be better and a little added structural support could be added, push pull pump vs a rotary that was on it. See where I am going with this? My thought is at the end on my seasonal use for this this year, emptying all gas out of the tank.... maybe even let it vent for a day or two and then fill it with water. At this point do you think it would be safe to cut and weld on?

I'd have all winter to let the water dry back out of it once finished.
 

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Back when carburetors were around I had a welding instructor in trade school. He told us to run exhaust into a fuel tank before welding and that would get rid of any oxygen so you could safely weld. If you have ever cut exhaust off of a carbureted car then you know that quite often the exhaust is still unburnt and flammable.Now I am older I think about some of the things these old guys said and wonder if any of them are still alive.
 

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I am not a welder, but recall hearing that a gas tank would be filled with water during a weld repair.
 
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While learning to weld in highschool, I was told by the instructor that filling the tank with water was the only way. He cautioned that it was dangerous. Fortunately, I've never had to attempt it.
 
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Years ago my wife's dad sold us a Volvo station wagon (a disaster on four tires) and one of the several problems with it was a weeping gas tank. There was a recall but I didn't find out until I had dropped the gas tank and brazed the leaky seam. I blew the tank out with air for a few minutes and then when I started to braze
woosh-boom:nerd:

So this is a story of how not to prepare a gas tank for welding or brazing.

 

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Sorry John, but that story gave me a good chuckle. I hope you weren't hurt.
 

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Nobody hurt, memo to self - never try that again :smile2:

Mission accomplished though. This car had Firestone Steel Belted Radial 500 tires - the steel belts were notorious for separating. I replaced the tires before they were recalled. I just remembered, this was a Volvo 265, circa mid 1970s. Its air conditioner would never cool down the interior enough for a Texas summer which is probably why my father-in-law wanted to get rid of it. But wait there's more.

After owning it for a while the engine started making a tapping noise. This was an overhead cam engine and one of the cam lobes developed a flat spot. Took it to a foreign car shop (they were low bidder) and the guy got the engine timing off when he put the new cam in, the engine sounded like it was going to fly apart.

Had it towed to another foreign car garage (a good one) and they fixed it right. I took garage #1 to small claims court to get my money back, got a judgement in my favor and the owner of the shop declared bankruptcy.

And that's why I will never own another Volvo.
 

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My end results should have been the same, back in 1990, I soldered a leaking seam on my under the seat gas tank on my 1970 cj5.

Not sure if soldering was the best way to fix it but it worked. I even soldering the pickup tube on the top of the new sending unit.


Years ago my wife's dad sold us a Volvo station wagon (a disaster on four tires) and one of the several problems with it was a weeping gas tank. There was a recall but I didn't find out until I had dropped the gas tank and brazed the leaky seam. I blew the tank out with air for a few minutes and then when I started to braze
woosh-boom:nerd:

So this is a story of how not to prepare a gas tank for welding or brazing.

 
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