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Discussion Starter #1
OK I just pulled out a 50 amp circuit breaker I got to put into a wiring project on the 2003 Jeep Rubicon. While I was looking over it I noticed that the wire connection on either side of the switch were covered with a black rubber cover insted of red covers. That got me to thinking that the juice actually flows out the negative side through the frame and to the positive side of the battery - or at least I remember learning that somewhere down the line. I'm not talking positive ground vs negative ground. Just which line the 50 amp circuit breaker goes on ??? which line positive or negative???? I was planning on putting it inline on the positive side. The project is to put a tractor 3 point hitch on the jeep so I can use tractor Implements, plow, blade, lifting pole, etc on either the front or rear of the jeep into a 2" receiver - similar to what the jeeps were doing right after WWII. The 3 point hitch has an electric motor and a hydraulic pump on it. I need to hook it into the jeeps battery and wire the plug in to the front and to the rear of the jeep depending on what I am doing. It has a hand held controller to lift or let it down with no ground pressure. 50 amp might seem like over kill but at least in short bursts it is using full battery voltage and- - - I'm not sure how many amps- - - ,( I'm using 4 gauge wire so there should not be an issue with juice flowing), probably at least close to a starter motor in amps.

Ideas????

Oh yea. It's easy to hook up , unhook & unload so it won't get in the way when I want to use it for other things??
 

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My VHF/UHF ham radio power leads are fused on both the positive and negative sides, there's a reason for fusing both sides but I don't remember :sleep:. I would go with Guy's advice and fuse or use a breaker on the positive side. Placing the fuse/breaker as close to the battery as possible like he recommended is really important.
 

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My VHF/UHF ham radio power leads are fused on both the positive and negative sides, there's a reason for fusing both sides but I don't remember :sleep:. I would go with Guy's advice and fuse or use a breaker on the positive side. Placing the fuse/breaker as close to the battery as possible like he recommended is really important.
A couple of my SS amps were factory fused on both leads. I just fuse on the positive side, if it was good enough to fuse or install a circuit breaker on the hot side on aircraft, it's good enough for anything I wire up
 

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My VHF/UHF ham radio power leads are fused on both the positive and negative sides, there's a reason for fusing both sides but I don't remember :sleep:.
A couple of my SS amps were factory fused on both leads.
Let's use the scenario that there is a fuse on positive and negative... What happens if the negative side fuse blows and the positive side doesn't? You have an ungrounded hot piece of equipment... right?

I would love to know why one would fuse the return. Never ever seen it myself.....
 

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I did a little research about fusing both sides and from what I gather, that's used in a floating system and not necessary in vehicles (for one example) with a chassis ground return. I think the manufacturer was covering all possible installation scenarios.
 

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Not knowing if the installation vehicle has a positive or negative ground system, manufacturers of floating ground radios fused both leads. With the possible exception of some heavy equipment, all vehicles have standardized to negative grounding.

Here is a link to a rational for the single fuse on the positive lead approach.


 

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I did a little research about fusing both sides and from what I gather, that's used in a floating system and not necessary in vehicles (for one example) with a chassis ground return. I think the manufacturer was covering all possible installation scenarios.
Not knowing if the installation vehicle has a positive or negative ground system, manufacturers of floating ground radios fused both leads. With the possible exception of some heavy equipment, all vehicles have standardized to negative grounding.
Ah OK.... So, if one were to receive a radio/accessory from the manufacturer with a fuse on both leads, and were installing in a neg ground vehicle... whack off the neg fuse...
 

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Most fuse they hot side because if you short out you can draw a lot of power and turn the wiring into heating elements creating a fire. That is why you fuse next to the battery, less chance of a short in that little distance. The negative side really can't short, and for the negative to have too much current to go through the wiring it would have to go through the positive wire first blowing the fuse.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Very interesting conversations - especially hearing about hi out put Ham Radios being fused on both sides. I'll put the circuit breaker close to the battery - wherever I can find a good spot - on the Jeep on the Hot side.

This brought up another question. The same 3 point hitch I described will fit on any 2"
receiver. The rest of the plan is to wire up my 3/4T dodge PU to the rear hitch to use with a lift pole that will lift 2000 lbs. I need this occasionally and I think the jeep might be just too short a wheel base to keep the front wheels on the ground. So if I simply wire the same hook up to the back of the Dodge it will work good. The plan is to run power from the front battery back to the rear of the bed where I already have a battery for a small camper shell to keep it charged up. Then run the plug wires from that battery out to the hitch. I'm thinking the run from the front to the rear is around 18' or so then maybe 5' to the 3 point hitch. Should I fuse as close to the front battery as I can and then again inline close between the 2ed battery hot post and the 3 point plug in. Since this will essentially 2 Hot runs????
 

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Anything leaving your battery should have a fuse on it as close to the battery as possible for reasons discussed earlier... if that wire/cable were to chafe through to ground you want that fuse to blow.
If you are running to a secondary battery, you may consider a battery isolator.
Tip.. get some of that wire loom to run your wires in from front to rear of vehicle...
74455
 
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