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So I am building a garage and want to put a lift in, what do you guys suggest? Want something solid and reliablefor the Jeeps, but do not need all the bells and whistles. Just something safe to use.
 

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I bought a two post lift from Greg Smith Equipment, mine is the 10,500 pound model. I think they call it a 10k lift now. It's been a good lift, no complaints except it's not wide enough for easy exit and entry when I put my F250 on it. I have to bias it to one side so I can get out of the truck. I made some videos of the install, below is the first one (I have a larger tractor now.)
 

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We are looking at building a shop with the intent of installing a lift. The 8K rated lifts I looked at require a 4" slab minimum. Any heavier lift requires thicker concrete. I'll pour footers for the lift and have a minimum of 6", reinforced (rebar) elsewhere. I need the lift to be 10K rated or higher to lift my F350. I don't feel good tying into a generic 4" concrete slab.
 

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6" slab and get a Bend pack 12.5k lift. I have 1ea a 12.5k and a 10k, the 12.5k is so much more stable than the 10k.
 

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I sold my place in MO and can't remember the model but my lift was a BendPak brand and it performed well and was reasonably priced. I wasn't sure which lift I was going to install when I was pouring my concrete floor so I dug a 12"D x 48"W x 120"L footing area with additional rebar. It was overkill but my concrete didn't crack around the lift. Please post before and after pics. Thanks
 

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BendPak and Rotary are probably the best lifts or at the very least very popular - especially the Rotary brand. My lift required a 5" thick slab which we had. The slab was poured to handle a 20,000 pound axle like on my motorhome so the footers are deep and the rebar I think is on 14" centers.

Don, when planning on a slab for a lift, keep the rebar away from the lift post footprint. When I was drilling holes for my posts I ran into rebar on a couple of holes - it took a lot of work with a metal drill bit to get that out of the way. I also used a special two part epoxy that was especially made for anchors or whatever into concrete. I have a good shot of epoxy in the hole before pounding the anchor in.
 

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BendPak and Rotary are probably the best lifts or at the very least very popular - especially the Rotary brand. My lift required a 5" thick slab which we had. The slab was poured to handle a 20,000 pound axle like on my motorhome so the footers are deep and the rebar I think is on 14" centers.

Don, when planning on a slab for a lift, keep the rebar away from the lift post footprint. When I was drilling holes for my posts I ran into rebar on a couple of holes - it took a lot of work with a metal drill bit to get that out of the way. I also used a special two part epoxy that was especially made for anchors or whatever into concrete. I have a good shot of epoxy in the hole before pounding the anchor in.
John, if I do it right, I'll have the lift mount plate dimensions and anchor hole spacing before pouring the slab. That way I can embed mount bolts into the concrete and tie them into the rebar. I have a little time before making a commitment. I want to see the economy settle down first. We plan to talk to our realtor and explore options of selling our house and looking for a bigger property...lots of unknowns with property prices right now, however.
 

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Don - too many variables to embed bolts in the exact place for the column mounting plates. I would use the mounting plate footprint and distance between the two to provide a slab area with no rebar. They could dig a sort of footer where each column would be and rebar the bottom of the 'footer' (or dig a footer in a + configuration.) That would be plenty strong for any kind of lift you would need.
 

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Don - too many variables to embed bolts in the exact place for the column mounting plates. I would use the mounting plate footprint and distance between the two to provide a slab area with no rebar. They could dig a sort of footer where each column would be and rebar the bottom of the 'footer' (or dig a footer in a + configuration.) That would be plenty strong for any kind of lift you would need.
Exactly what I did and it worked out well. During the move in, I relocated the lift 6" closer to the exit to gain more room to move between my workbench and the lift post.
 

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Thanks guys, will look into bendpak and rotary. Talked to the concrete guy and they will dig a trench where the lift goes and lay 12" of concrete with no rebar.
 

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No need for a trench under the lift with 3000+ psi 6" slab, use a 12x12 grid rebar pattern on the complete slab. DO not cut the slab trowel in the control joints every 10'
Your dirt work is import and, compact to 95% and have at least 6" of base compacted.
I've done a few shop builds and have never had a crack. Prep is everything. FYI I have built all in heavy earthquake areas.
I lift 10-12k big trucks not just light jeeps...as even my 6600 lbs JK is in comparison.
 

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I bought a two post lift from Greg Smith Equipment, mine is the 10,500 pound model. I think they call it a 10k lift now. It's been a good lift, no complaints except it's not wide enough for easy exit and entry when I put my F250 on it. I have to bias it to one side so I can get out of the truck. I made some videos of the install, below is the first one (I have a larger tractor now.)
Whoaaa! Okay! cracking me up:D:D:D:D
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I managed to gave the footing under the lift,
so no problem with concrete thickness
 
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