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I have done a search but came up empty. This condition existed with stock springs and shocks, now stock springs with leveling kit and Rancho XL adjustable shocks on a 2018 JKU Recon Edition with the sway bar disconnected. The lean is so bad that it feels like a flop is coming, condition is worse on passenger side (gas tank weight?). We ran Fins N Things a couple of weeks ago and the beginning made us real nervous. Adjusted the shocks to full stiffness and stability was a little better but not by much. Reconnected sway bar and felt secure finishing the trail. Has anyone else experienced this? I swear judging by the hood it looks like 45 degrees and about to flop. Are the stock springs that soft?

I'm not new to wheeling, over 480 different trails between Colorado and Utah.
 

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A friend's JKUR had the bad tilt to the point that he needed a spotter whenever on a bad off-camber move. The major issue was the Antirock sway bars front and back. I watched closely and looked like most of the problem was the rear swaybar. I don't think there was an adjustment to tighten them up and it was just too loose.

He eventually took his Jeep to a pro and had a suspension makeover with new springs, shocks and swaybars. I could get the details of which parts but right now don't have them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A friend's JKUR had the bad tilt to the point that he needed a spotter whenever on a bad off-camber move. The major issue was the Antirock sway bars front and back. I watched closely and looked like most of the problem was the rear swaybar. I don't think there was an adjustment to tighten them up and it was just too loose.

He eventually took his Jeep to a pro and had a suspension makeover with new springs, shocks and swaybars. I could get the details of which parts but right now don't have them.
Details on the rear sway bar if it was replaced would be great, thanks.
 

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So I am at home and bored. This social distancing has my ADD going off. Between projects I hit the internet.
The pic above is my jk on a flat logging road with one front tire riding up the bank. The coil is soft enough that just the weight of my jeep will compress it into the bump stop. If you have a daily driver, and are running trails and gravel roads at normal speeds then you need soft coils like this. Your factory ones are like this. If you went to firmer ones it would be rough enough on the highway that you wouldn't want to drive it.

Shocks are another topic. When you firm up your shocks the springs will compress just the same but it will take a little longer to do so. A shock is a complicated piece of equipment but it really does just one thing. It slows down the rate of compression and rebound. If you took one of your shocks off and cycled it you would see that it takes some force to move it slowly but a far greater force to move it fast. Shocks give you stability but not so much when you are in 4 low first gear.

If you want to take your Jeep out and go full blast through the desert or on deactivated logging roads then you will want harder springs and some kind of bypass shocks. Desert trucks hit hard impacts fast and need to absorb energy.

If your off camber leans make you nervous then don't disco your sway bar. No one says you have to. If you don't have traction problems then don't worry about it.
You could also download a app on your phone to see just how much your leaning. It might not be as bad as you think. We used to wheel into a lake around here that had a bad off camber to get into. Going in the driver was on the high side and my girlfriend used to squeal. Coming home wasn't a problem for her but made me take notice.
I Moab when you can see where your going to roll it is even worse.
 

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Being off camber used to make me really nervous but the more I did it the more I knew the Jeep's limits (and mine.) There's a rather long off camber section on the slickrock part of 7 Mile Rim which is very intimidating the first time or two you run it.
 

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I’m not that fond of off camber situations and my wife even less, but at least she’s learned to trust me. Kane Creek had some off camber mixed with washouts that made me pucker.

On Cliffhanger I took this obstacle incorrectly and took this picture before I backed off. We had never done this trail. I’m not very proud of this picture 😁
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Discussion Starter #10
First I want to say thanks guys to all the replies! I will reply kind of in order, rlenglish first. Reconecting the from sway bar made things much better the rest of the trail. This was the first time on the new entrance to Fins N Things, if you are familiar with this then you know the off camber sections I mean. Once I reconnected the front sway bar, I don't think there were any bad off camber sections left. Leaving the sway bar connected may be the new norm for now although I always discoed my 2004 Rubicon.

Next is johncanfield. I know the section you are referring to on 7 Mile Rim. I first did this trail in 2002 in a 2001 Blazer ZR2 and with the IFS this section didn't bother me at all. The second time I ran this trail was in a 2004 Jeep TJ Rubicon, which got my attention but still did not scare me.

Last is Norminator. The one and only time I ran cliffhanger was in 2003 with the Blazer but from some of videos I have seen the trail looks much tougher now. I have done Kane Creek with the Blazer around 2003 and the TJ Rubicon in 2012. In your pic above our jeep felt like it was leaning a little more than that but I can't say for sure since I didn't have a inclinometer. My wife has always said that she has always felt safe and never worried about wheeling until we got this JKUR with the front sway bar disconnected.

My 2004 rubicon was built with a 4" lift with long arms and triangulated upper rear control arms. Our days of trails like Pritchet and such are over so when we bought the JKUR I decided to just do the leveling kit plus new shocks. I will be running 255 80R 17's (33.3") tires when the MTR's wear out. I know on a JKU that 35's are almost mandatory so I have a full set of Rockhard Skids including the cross member under the jeep and they got used on Fins N Things.

Thanks again guys, I wanted to see if this was a common problem with basically stock JKUR set up.
 

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Thanks for the replies. You’ve obviously had experience to which I took at face value from your first thread opener. It’s good to hear you lay it out like that. It illustrates your experience and drives home your dilemma. I’m really curious.

The rear sway bar was mentioned earlier...anything loose?
Do you think anything is cracked anywhere that you can’t see?

I did some searching and apparently there is a leaning issue with the more contemporary wranglers. The most minimal seems to be a lean from gas tank weight. It seems you addressed that with levelers.

I guess I’d try to replicate the situation safely and get under there safely to look.
 

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I was leading a group of about 12 on 7 Mile Rim and I stopped on the off camber slickrock section to make sure everybody was doing okay behind me and there was a gal that almost freaked out "why did we stop?!?!" LOL.

The first part of Cliffhanger is quite a challenge, a lot of these trails change from year to year and what might have a 3.5 rated trail turns into a 4.0. I've only run it one time, not my favorite Moab trail.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the replies. You’ve obviously had experience to which I took at face value from your first thread opener. It’s good to hear you lay it out like that. It illustrates your experience and drives home your dilemma. I’m really curious.

The rear sway bar was mentioned earlier...anything loose?
Do you think anything is cracked anywhere that you can’t see?

I did some searching and apparently there is a leaning issue with the more contemporary wranglers. The most minimal seems to be a lean from gas tank weight. It seems you addressed that with levelers.

I guess I’d try to replicate the situation safely and get under there safely to look.
I can't find anything loose or cracks in springs, sway bar, frame. Bought the vehicle almost new and it did not appear to ever been off road. The gas tank was full, that and with the additional weight of a JKU hardtop might have been the culprit. That's a lot of weight plus the additional Rockhard skid plate under the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I was leading a group of about 12 on 7 Mile Rim and I stopped on the off camber slickrock section to make sure everybody was doing okay behind me and there was a gal that almost freaked out "why did we stop?!?!" LOL.

The first part of Cliffhanger is quite a challenge, a lot of these trails change from year to year and what might have a 3.5 rated trail turns into a 4.0. I've only run it one time, not my favorite Moab trail.
I ran Cliffhanger twice in the Blazer and going back up the start of the trail or end as the case may be, the far left side is the route I took, looked easier to me.

By the way, I just order an inclinometer so I can see if the crease in my seat is accurate or not!
 

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I run off camber a lot on old mining trails. Most of the time I never get a picture of the more interesting spots I go through, just because I only wheel alone. I got a pic recently on one of the not so bad bits of a trail. You can really see the effects of good ole gravity on the Jeep. It is amazing how far you can lean without tipping. It doesn't look like much from the picture(and this spot really wasn't too bad), as it's hard to convey whats going on in 2D, but you can see the suspension at work. The view out of the passenger window was a bit ominous too as it was looking right into the bottom of the canyon. Those miners were definitely a brave bunch.
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