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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, new to the forum. My wife and I are talking about getting our first Rubi. Not sure I really want the Auto Trans. I have only driven Manual trans vehicles, I've only owned a couple Auto Trans vehicles but those were the wifes.

I guess Im looking for some Pros/Cons to each. I'm tempted to get the automatic but have driven a manual my entire life (I'm in my 50's) so it isn't out of the question for me to keep shifting. Besides having a stick is kinda a Mellinial Anti Theft Device isn't it?? ;)

Living in Illinois I won't be off on to many mountains but Wisconsin isn't entirely out of the question. And going camping with my kids (7 & 9) both boys would make for a ton o fun and make some lifelong memories for them.

So give it to me guys, pros and cons to the Auto vs. Manual transmission. TIA
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum.

I drove tractor trailers for a living. I had a manual CJ7 for 35 years. I now own an auto I bought in 2004. In 2004 I couldn’t decide until I put my hand on the auto handle and it hit me straight out - I’m DONE with shifting. I won with that decision.

I often drive in traffic. No more constant clutch and shifting.

On trails an auto is forgiving. It means a lot to leave it in gear while navigating an obstacle and simply apply the brake, figure out what you and your spotter want to do, and then let off the brake and go. Sometimes obstacles are in several parts such as spaced out steps or ledges and it’s better to not gas through them all as one. I like the auto for that.

And lastly for me. In Moab, I will just simply live longer in an auto.
 

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I have driven both and as usual make hard and fast opinions that are usually wrong. I see you are trying to decide on what engine also.
The 3.6 you can get in either but for now the 2.0 turbo is automatic only. There is rumour that it ay be available with a m/t next year but nothing is confirmed.
The way a 8 speed auto works is nothing like it was 20 or even 10 years ago, everybody that has one likes them.
The m/t 6 speed works well, there is a ongoing clutch recall but I wouldn't let that stop me from buying one.

The complaints I hear about the m/t is the bottom end torque that most engines are not making anymore. Even a Rubicon with 4.10 gears the driver has to readjust their driving habits to compensate.

My self I would consider a m/t but only if I was getting a light 2 door. A 4door or gladiator I would stick with a auto.

But YOU really need to drive both and make up your own mind. Can you live with yourself if you didn't shift gears?
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I have driven both and as usual make hard and fast opinions that are usually wrong. I see you are trying to decide on what engine also.
The 3.6 you can get in either but for now the 2.0 turbo is automatic only. There is rumour that it ay be available with a m/t next year but nothing is confirmed.
The way a 8 speed auto works is nothing like it was 20 or even 10 years ago, everybody that has one likes them.
The m/t 6 speed works well, there is a ongoing clutch recall but I wouldn't let that stop me from buying one.

The complaints I hear about the m/t is the bottom end torque that most engines are not making anymore. Even a Rubicon with 4.10 gears the driver has to readjust their driving habits to compensate.

My self I would consider a m/t but only if I was getting a light 2 door. A 4door or gladiator I would stick with a auto.

But YOU really need to drive both and make up your own mind. Can you live with yourself if you didn't shift gears?
That is a good question, "Can you live with yourself if you didn't shift gears?". I think I could, different work vehicles are always auto.

calling around all my local dealerships( I live near Chicago) I can not find one single m/t Rubi to save my life. I just don't know what I will decide. Thanks for your reply.
 

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In my gladiator there is a manual mode for the auto transmission...not quite like a MT, but it gives you a bit more control. There is also a Select Speed Control for 4W low range that works sort of like cruise control. With the gear selector you can choose 1 through 8 for a pre-selected speed that the jeep will hold without operator input. Its especially good for long, down hill sections.
 

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Welcome aboard. If you have plans to off-road and run trails (and inexperienced) I strongly recommend you go with an automatic tranny. I was wheeling with a guy in a 2 door JK and manual trans (Black Hills of South Dakota.) He was pretty inexperienced and after a day on the trail he was so completely frustrated his plan was to sell it immediately and buy a Rubi with auto trans. Watching him struggle on relatively easy obstacles, I felt badly for the guy.

On the other hand, if an experienced wheeler a manual is fine. I've been on many trails with a guy in a 4-door with a manual, no problem. He's very comfortable with his rig.

Having a manual as a commuting daily driver - no way (been there.)
 

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I have had both.
Auto if you are in traffic or in mud where wheel spin is important.
Manual for rock crawling.
All my 3 rubies were manuals, but when I did the LS swap, went auto. Now I have a mix.
 

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I prefer an automatic in street vehicles except for sports cars they have to be manual. For off roading, I prefer an automatic because I only have two feet and a manual transmission vehicle has three pedals unless you add a hand throttle. I'm comfortable heel and toeing a sports car's throttle and brake but not sure how well I'd do using the same technique off roading.
 

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A different angle from those above is the "family" aspect... would be hard for your kids to learn stick if you don't own one (and they are made less and less nowadays), but on the other hand, if your wife isn't as experienced with a manual as you she may not be comfortable driving the rig (I'm assuming that would be a con ;)).
 

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I learned to drive in a 1956 Chevy with three on the column that had a tendency for the linkage to hang up; we would have to stop, open the hood and move the linkage back to neutral.

My Japanese gray market mini-truck for the ranch is right hand drive with the stick shift on the left side. Took me about an hour to get used to shifting gears with my left hand 🤠 .
 

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offroad......................Auto...when was the last time you saw a KOH 4400 car running a stick..
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In my gladiator there is a manual mode for the auto transmission...not quite like a MT, but it gives you a bit more control. There is also a Select Speed Control for 4W low range that works sort of like cruise control. With the gear selector you can choose 1 through 8 for a pre-selected speed that the jeep will hold without operator input. Its especially good for long, down hill sections.
That gear selector sounds pretty interesting. I was aware of the ability to "shift" from the auto mode, just not the same thing I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Welcome aboard. If you have plans to off-road and run trails (and inexperienced) I strongly recommend you go with an automatic tranny. I was wheeling with a guy in a 2 door JK and manual trans (Black Hills of South Dakota.) He was pretty inexperienced and after a day on the trail he was so completely frustrated his plan was to sell it immediately and buy a Rubi with auto trans. Watching him struggle on relatively easy obstacles, I felt badly for the guy.

On the other hand, if an experienced wheeler a manual is fine. I've been on many trails with a guy in a 4-door with a manual, no problem. He's very comfortable with his rig.

Having a manual as a commuting daily driver - no way (been there.)
Thanks for your input, I imagine a heel/toe would be required to make things more smooth. I'v always had a manual everywhere I go. Can you imagine trying to drive a manual in down town Chicago? Pretty crazy but I've done it. Commuting you say? that's all I know. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have had both.
Auto if you are in traffic or in mud where wheel spin is important.
Manual for rock crawling.
All my 3 rubies were manuals, but when I did the LS swap, went auto. Now I have a mix.
I can defiantly see an auto for bumper to bumper traffic, but the rest of my stuff I see no reason to switch. I think I have shifted slightly from an 80/20 to maybe a 70/30, so the auto is still loosing. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A different angle from those above is the "family" aspect... would be hard for your kids to learn stick if you don't own one (and they are made less and less nowadays), but on the other hand, if your wife isn't as experienced with a manual as you she may not be comfortable driving the rig (I'm assuming that would be a con ;)).
You are dead accurate, my boys might never learn if I can't carry the torch! As far as my wife? When she learned to drive I had a manual, so if she wanted to drive anywhere she had no choice but to learn. She isn't to concerned now, she had a good foot. Am I lucky? ;)
 

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I'm on hold in shopping for my jeep but I'm leaning toward auto. The newest transmissions are hard to beat when they're stock plus there are lots of ways to bump up the features. Hmm. Just made my own decision.

As for the kids learning manual shifting; they probably never will need to. I learned on a motorcycle and easily translated the skills to a car. That's always an option.

Tried to teach my late 50s neighbor to drive my MGB with manual. She couldn't coordinate her feet to do it. If she pushed down on the gas she also pushed down on the clutch and vice versa. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I learned to drive in a 1956 Chevy with three on the column that had a tendency for the linkage to hang up; we would have to stop, open the hood and move the linkage back to neutral.

My Japanese gray market mini-truck for the ranch is right hand drive with the stick shift on the left side. Took me about an hour to get used to shifting gears with my left hand 🤠 .
lol your killing me! I haven't seen a Three On The Tree is forever! And having to jump out all the time to move the linkage...

As far as the right hand drive, that might take an hour or two to get used to, it's driving on the other side of the street that might get me killed..🤪
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm on hold in shopping for my jeep but I'm leaning toward auto. The newest transmissions are hard to beat when they're stock plus there are lots of ways to bump up the features. Hmm. Just made my own decision.

As for the kids learning manual shifting; they probably never will need to. I learned on a motorcycle and easily translated the skills to a car. That's always an option.

Tried to teach my late 50s neighbor to drive my MGB with manual. She couldn't coordinate her feet to do it. If she pushed down on the gas she also pushed down on the clutch and vice versa. :)
Good point on the motorcycle way of learning, and your right the kids may never need to know, what a shame.

Your neighbor? How does she handle the brake if she always pushes to feet? lol
 

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"...My Japanese gray market mini-truck for the ranch is right hand drive with the stick shift on the left side. Took me about an hour to get used to shifting gears with my left hand 🤠" .
When I was driving in New Zealand I was fine with everything being opposite except I kept turning on the wipers when trying to use the turn signals.
 
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