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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello Ladies and Gents,

I am about to change my front rotors and pads to Centric premium and black magic pads. Before i went about doing it I checked the rears to see how they were and discovered that one fo the brake pads (inner side on the passenger wheel) was totally worn to metal. The outer pad still has some life left on it. Curious about the wear I checked the other side and the inner pad was ok but was worn put considerably more than the outer side. What could be the reason for uneven wear ?
I did see that the inside of the parking brake was little wet may be brake fluid leaking in there ? The bleeding valve was also wet but not dripping. The fluid in the reservoir was tad bit low but close to full. My parking brakes are also not set very well i can pull them all the way but they don't to stop the jeep from rolling.
Oh and while trying to take the seized pad off i did score inside of the the surface which pushes the pad against the rotor.

20190810_131952.jpg

I have already ordered set of rotors and pads for rear but want to know whats going on with the pad wear and is it ok to install the new rotors and pads with the minor scoring on the surface of the piston.

Thanks for advice and comments

lavi
 

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I started to reply and see you edited your post and added pics of the piston.
The inner part of the piston is okay, you may want to hit the part that contacts the brake pad with a file just to get it flat.
It looks and sounds like your caliper is not releasing enough pressure when the pedal is released.
By the looks of the pics that is a lot of corrosion - may just be the pic- the caliper needs to slide, and more importantly retract easily when pressure is released.
Also, are the pads in the picture in the position as they were removed? Not following the inner/outer in respect to the pics.
 

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It's brakes. Don't mess around, for the few dollars replace your calipers also. If it were mine I would also replace the brake hoses. Do the complete job then you will be done.


Pads can wear uneven just because of the way they mount. The calipers could be sticking or the slides have corrosion inside the boot. On older vehicles the brake hose can collapse internally and not let brake fluid through or not let it back so the caliper can release.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Also, are the pads in the picture in the position as they were removed? Not following the inner/outer in respect to the pics.
Thanks for quick reply FLLJ. My bad on the pics I got them mixed up along with inner vs outer pad. The one with pads on the caliper is from the front not rear. But on all the brakes outer pad is wearing more than inner as you can see in the pics.
The corrosion is by product of living in Chicago area. I do plan to do a thorough clean up and great he guide pins (which i read could be the cause).

I want to put in the good stuff, black magic, on the front but want to make sure if cleaning and greasing will fix things up.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's brakes. Don't mess around, for the few dollars replace your calipers also. If it were mine I would also replace the brake hoses. Do the complete job then you will be done..
I wouldn't mind replacing caliper if its needed. I would rather have the old original part , if it doesn't need replacing, then aftermarket stuff which i think is inferior in most cases. I do have new brake lines which will go in now that you mentioned those could be a problem, i was putting it off for one reason or other. Fronts already have braided lines from AEV replaced around 40k miles ago so i am assuming those should last some more time.
 

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I wouldn't mind replacing caliper if its needed. I would rather have the old original part , if it doesn't need replacing, then aftermarket stuff which i think is inferior in most cases. I do have new brake lines which will go in now that you mentioned those could be a problem, i was putting it off for one reason or other. Fronts already have braided lines from AEV replaced around 40k miles ago so i am assuming those should last some more time.

Rebuild the calipers yourself. It's very easy. Pistons are about 8 dollars and Centric seals are about the same cost. Once the caliper is off it took me about 10 minutes to rebuild working at my slow pace.
 

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Before you start make sure your brake bleeder screws aren't seized.
 

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I just did my brake lines on an '06 LJR. The rear brake lines, as you have probably noticed, are different on the Rubi than on other models, in that they are a combination of hard and soft lines.


I have heard that the older soft lines wear on the inside, especially if the brake fluid is not changed regularly (every year or two), causing little flaps on the inside of the hoses. These flaps retard the flow of fluid back to the reservoir when the pedal is released. The symptom is that the brake piston does not retract and you get what you've got. I cannot tell if that's the cause for your issue, but it is probably time to change the lines and replace the fluid.


I bought speed bleeders and installed them. Makes bleeding much easier. Also, three of the original bleeders were rusted in place and had been rounded off by the PO or his mech. Ended up removing them with a pipe wrench, which worked just fine. I have heard people complain about the speed bleeders, but I've had them for a couple of months and no signs of leakage.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replies and tip on rebuilding the caliper. I am all about factory parts unless the aftermarket part provides benefit like black magic pads so I may end up rebuilding the caliper as the Mopar one is expensive. I hope its as easy as wildrat says but with all the rust here in Chicago everything takes much longer. If it turns out to be easy i may rebuild all of them. Heck for the price of the kit i wont mind trying.
I have bled my brakes few times already and changed the fluid so i know the bleeder valves turn except one which i stripped so that will be replaced too. Rear rotors and parts on order to be delivered on Tuesday so hopefully will get this taken care during next week.
 

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Thanks for the replies and tip on rebuilding the caliper. I am all about factory parts unless the aftermarket part provides benefit like black magic pads so I may end up rebuilding the caliper as the Mopar one is expensive. I hope its as easy as wildrat says but with all the rust here in Chicago everything takes much longer. If it turns out to be easy i may rebuild all of them. Heck for the price of the kit i wont mind trying.

In the kit there is one seal and a dust cover. There are videos on You Tube, but glean them so you find the people who have common sense and mechanical abilities. One tip, before disconnecting the brake line to the caliper, pump the brake a couple times to push the piston out a bit, otherwise you will need to use compressed air and blow into the brake line hole to push the piston out. I suggest replacing the pistons also. They were the problem with my brakes, at least so far. LOL
 

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If it's within your budget, replace the complete caliper. Just do it! JMHO ?

On this note: When Phil/Aeroshot told me the pistons were made of phenolic, I did further research and found out when calipers are re-manufactured the re-builders will utilize the old phenolic pistons.

Since rebuilding my calipers with new pistons and seals I have had no more problems with dragging brakes.

My issue began years ago after I moved from Florida to my current location. I hauled a tandem wheel trailer loaded with some of my junk. I did not think the trailer was too heavy for the Jeep, but I am not an expert in this area.

I am thinking since the front brakes (my problem) give approx. 70% of braking power I figured they overheated. I was not aware manufacturers were using phenolic for calipers. When Phil/Aeroshot told me a light bulb went off in my head. I know about phenolic since it was used on some of the aircraft I worked on. I read up on the phenolic pistons and they serve a purpose. For regular driving I am sure they are fine and since my Jeep gets very little use I went back with phenolic pistons. Phil has a very knowledgeable friend who works for NAPA and he told me they make metal pistons, and the cost is not much more than NAPA's phenolic pistons.

My problem was intermittent and only reared it's head in the heat of summer, never in winter. Once I learned about the phenolic pistons everything made sense. I suspect the pistons while I drove and braked were expanding and causing the brakes to drag.

Since I have replaced the pistons I have had no further problems, but since I have had this issue for a few years and drive very little I am going to wait till the heat of summer is over, around October here. LOL

I still have no confidence the issue is fixed, but I am pretty sure it is. Nevertheless I am going to wait and make sure before installing my new drilled and slotted rotors. I have new pistons for the rear calipers also. I intended to rebuild them also when I replace the rotors, but since they have no issues I may hold off. No sense fixing what's not broke, but I will at least have the parts.
At one time in the past I did have a left rear brake issue similar to yours. The one pad wore before the other and destroyed the rotor. I replaced the caliper, rotor, and pads to fix the issue.
Anyway, time for me to get out the door to ride. Oh, I bought my pistons, and the Centric seals on Rock Auto. I had a coupon.

If you decide to rebuild I can give a bit of advice if you need it. I'll be around. LOL
 

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I recently went with some bigger front brakes. Dual piston calipers off a new Grand Cherokee with Yellow stuff pads, rotors off a Mercedes S500. Used '88 XJ knuckles.

Very significant improvement in stopping power/distance compared to the Centric premium rotors and Black Magic pads I was running before. Very significant.







The factory replacement Centric rotors and BM pads were a tad better than the same Centric rotors with Yellow stuff pads though. Well, over all, in my opinion they were. The BM's had a bit better cold stop bite. The Yellows worked better when hot. Every panic stop situation I've ever been in was with cold brakes though.

Either way, this new combo kicks the crap out of the puny little factory parts though.

- DAA
 

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I recently went with some bigger front brakes. Dual piston calipers off a new Grand Cherokee with Yellow stuff pads, rotors off a Mercedes S500. Used '88 XJ knuckles.

Very significant improvement in stopping power/distance compared to the Centric premium rotors and Black Magic pads I was running before. Very significant.


Either way, this new combo kicks the crap out of the puny little factory parts though.

- DAA
Very nice set up.

Are the spacers to allow wheel clearance for the larger calipers on the shallower rotors?
Also, have you done anything to the rears, or any plans?

Sorry for all the questions... I'm working on plans for a future build.
 

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No, the spacers aren't needed at all for the brakes. The 17" wheels are though.

On the rear I have Centric Premium rotors and Black Magic pads. It's working well.

- DAA
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I recently went with some bigger front brakes. Dual piston calipers off a new Grand Cherokee with Yellow stuff pads, rotors off a Mercedes S500. Used '88 XJ knuckles.
That set up looks very nice . I already have centric premium rotors and BM pads sitting in the garage otherwise would have definitely looked into it. Curious though what other parts did you need ? I already have 17 inch Pintlers sitting in the garage so have to price out other parts. Are these plug and play. I am sure the pics got lot of people drooling too.

Wildrat/Aero,

I ordered phenolic pistons already, from RockAuto obviously, but if metal are better i can pick them up from NAPA. I followed your thread on brake issue for a while so glad to know that you found or seem to found the cure.
Replacing caliper is Ok but with rebuilding I can use metal piston instead of phenolic. I am not sure if the caliper itself is made better from factory than aftermarket but if it does than thats another advantage of rebuilding.

Got pads today, rotors and rebuild kit in next few days. Hopefully I can tackle it early next week as I will be out in UP for next few days. Its good that this happened during summer break and I can afford to loose a vehicle without much hassle to the Mrs but gotta button things up before too long.
Thanks to all the help I think I can get it done in time before school starts
 

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Curious though what other parts did you need ? I already have 17 inch Pintlers sitting in the garage so have to price out other parts. Are these plug and play.
Besides the parts already mentioned, I needed new bolts and four simple round spacers for the caliper brackets. The rotors need some slight modification in a lathe, too. So it isn't quite out of the box plug and play, but it's close. It didn't change steering geometry or require any steering mods though, which makes it less expensive than a WJ knuckle swap - and these are bigger rotors than WJ as well.

I have a complete write up on it with part numbers for everything here - LJ better brakes.

- DAA
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Mark,

Did you order the piston from Napa or the caliper. I am seeing this part number on their website SE4890S. Can you confirm if that is the part. The piston itself is 17.99 and the caliper with the steel piston is 33.
 
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